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Phone Calls and Exercise Make Pain Treatments More Effective

November 15, 2011, 11:28 am by Scientific American: Health

iStockphoto/YanLev Chronic pain affects at least a fifth of the U.S. population, yet many of these people remain in significant physical discomfort whether they receive treatment or not . Even strong drugs , such as opioids, are often not up to the task, which is one of the reasons why researchers are looking to other avenues to treat this ailment. [More]


Featured Medical Stories

Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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The Art of Lip Injections

The Secret Art of Natural Lip Injections

Is there a secret art to lip enhancement? You surely know when you've seen someone and immediately reacted, "she had her lips done!". What about the lips that have been filled, look terrific, and you don't know they've been enhanced with filler? That's the secret art to lip fillers and that is why it is critical to select a physician injector who knows the secrets. What are the secrets to getting great lip enhancements? First, experience! Second, the artist within! The injector must also understand the complex, and sometimes unforgiving, anatomy of the lips. These artistic and technical demands explain why so many patients receive sub-standard lip injections and are left with unnatural results. Patients often believe that lip enhancement always leads to unnatural, over-filled results; in actuality, this should never occur in experienced hands.

Read The Art of Lip Fillers Find Lip Filler Doctor Near You Google Lip Fillers

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