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Weighing the Risks

May 5, 2012, 9:00 am by Scientific American: Health

One of the biggest choices an expectant mother faces is how to handle the pain of childbirth. More than 60 per­cent of American women choose relief in the form of an epi­dural, a combination of local anesthetic and narcotic administered into the epidural space surrounding the spinal cord. Although most doctors believe that the injections are safe, a new study suggests that they may increase the risk that a mother will develop a fever during labor, which could, in rare instances, pose risks to her baby. [More]


Featured Medical Stories

Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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The Art of Lip Injections

The Secret Art of Natural Lip Injections

Is there a secret art to lip enhancement? You surely know when you've seen someone and immediately reacted, "she had her lips done!". What about the lips that have been filled, look terrific, and you don't know they've been enhanced with filler? That's the secret art to lip fillers and that is why it is critical to select a physician injector who knows the secrets. What are the secrets to getting great lip enhancements? First, experience! Second, the artist within! The injector must also understand the complex, and sometimes unforgiving, anatomy of the lips. These artistic and technical demands explain why so many patients receive sub-standard lip injections and are left with unnatural results. Patients often believe that lip enhancement always leads to unnatural, over-filled results; in actuality, this should never occur in experienced hands.

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