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Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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The Art of Lip Injections

The Secret Art of Natural Lip Injections

Is there a secret art to lip enhancement? You surely know when you've seen someone and immediately reacted, "she had her lips done!". What about the lips that have been filled, look terrific, and you don't know they've been enhanced with filler? That's the secret art to lip fillers and that is why it is critical to select a physician injector who knows the secrets. What are the secrets to getting great lip enhancements? First, experience! Second, the artist within! The injector must also understand the complex, and sometimes unforgiving, anatomy of the lips. These artistic and technical demands explain why so many patients receive sub-standard lip injections and are left with unnatural results. Patients often believe that lip enhancement always leads to unnatural, over-filled results; in actuality, this should never occur in experienced hands.

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PSA Screenings Decline

PSA Screenings Decline Following New Recommendations

The Journal of Urology reports that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing has declined in the United States following a 2013 recommendation by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)—a group of primary care physicians charged with developing recommendations about which preventative health screenings should be covered under the Affordable Health Care Act.

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Medical News Headlines

Fist bumps less germy than handshakes, study says

Associated Press Healthwire: July 28, 2014
NEW YORK (AP) -- When it comes to preventing the spread of germs, maybe the president is on to something with his fondness for fist bumps....

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Well: Nursing Home Unthinkable? Be Prepared in Case It’s Inevitable

New York Times - Health: July 28, 2014
Be an ‘educated customer’ if the needs of an aging relative or friends become too difficult to handle at home.

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Virus drugmaker fights pediatricians' new advice

Associated Press Healthwire: July 28, 2014
CHICAGO (AP) -- A costly drug given mostly to premature babies is at the center of a clash between the manufacturer and the nation's leading pediatrician's group, which recommends scaling back use of the medicine....

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Multiple Methods Enable Doctors to Treat Dizziness

Scientific American: Health: July 27, 2014
Exercises, surgeries and pharmacological interventions can aid vertigo sufferers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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American doctor in Africa gets treatment for Ebola

Associated Press Healthwire: July 27, 2014
BOONE, N.C. (AP) -- A spokeswoman for an aid organization says an American doctor is receiving intensive medical treatment in Africa after he was infected with the deadly Ebola virus....

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Groups Press New York State to Ban Poisons That Kill Wildlife

New York Times - Health: July 27, 2014
Wildlife and conservation groups are citing new evidence gathered from post-mortem examinations by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

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DealBook: Equinox Fitness Is Buying Rest of Millennium’s Gyms

New York Times - Health: July 27, 2014
The $110 million deal is for the remaining gyms owned by Millennium Partners, and it expands Equinox’s empire to 73 locations worldwide.

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Pregnancy for Pay: A Surrogacy Agency That Delivered Heartache

New York Times - Health: July 27, 2014
Agencies like Planet Hospital in California that match surrogacy clinics with intended parents are often rife with fraud and mismanagement.

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Blood donors 'pass on hepatitis E'

BBC Health: July 27, 2014
Around 1,200 people each year are infected with hepatitis E through donated blood in England, a large study shows.

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Fist bumps 'cleaner than handshakes'

BBC Health: July 27, 2014
Scientists at Aberystwyth University in Wales have shown that more bacteria are transferred by shaking hands, than by fist-bumping or high-fiving.

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Fear of Ebola Breeds a Terror of Physicians

New York Times - Health: July 27, 2014
Health workers with Doctors Without Borders have been threatened with knives, stones and machetes by Guineans who believe they are the cause of the virus’ spread.

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Balancing Special-Education Needs With Rising Costs

New York Times - Health: July 27, 2014
The City of New York pays for about 12,000 special-needs students per year to receive private school educations. Parents contend that the city fights too many of these requests, delaying important services to students in the process.

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Lawmakers Reach Deal on a Fix for V.A.’s Health Care System

New York Times - Health: July 27, 2014
The measure is expected to set aside billions of dollars to hire new doctors, build new buildings and upgrade the department’s scheduling system.

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Hospira Bidding for Danone Medical-Nutrition Unit

Wall Street Journal: July 27, 2014
Hospira has emerged as a bidder for Danone's medical-nutrition unit in a deal that could be worth about $5 billion and mark the latest in a flurry of so-called inversion deals.

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'Nerve centre for appetite control'

BBC Health: July 27, 2014
Scientists have found a key cluster of nerve cells that can stop food consumption, according to research in mice.

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For Coconut Waters, a Street Fight for Shelf Space

New York Times - Health: July 26, 2014
Why is coconut water everywhere? Because two companies battled for market share, one yoga studio and corner store at a time.

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Perils of the English countryside

BBC Health: July 26, 2014
The risks you may face while taking a walk

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Epigenetic changes can drive cancer, study shows

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 26, 2014
A mouse model has been created providing the first in vivo evidence that epigenetic alterations alone can cause cancer. Epigenetic alterations don't change the DNA sequence but how it is 'read.' In particular, DNA methylation, the addition of a methyl group (or molecule), is an epigenetic switch that can stably turn off genes, suggesting the potential to cause cancer just as a genetic mutation can. Until now, direct evidence that DNA methylation drives cancer formation was lacking.

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Tar Wars National Conference Showcases Prevention Efforts

American Academy of Family Physicians: July 26, 2014
The AAFP hosted its annual Tar Wars National Conference July 21-22 in Washington to recognize a group of fourth- and fifth-graders for spreading the word to their peers to stay tobacco-free.

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Sun 'can harm sight as well as skin'

BBC Health: July 26, 2014
How the sun can damage sight as well as skin

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Six seconds 'can transform health'

BBC Health: July 26, 2014
Short six-second bursts of vigorous exercise have the potential to transform the health of elderly people, say researchers.

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Cancer blood test moves step closer

BBC Health: July 26, 2014
A British team of researchers has developed what might be a simple blood test for cancer, scientists from the University of Bradford say.

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Nigeria 'on red alert' over Ebola

BBC Health: July 26, 2014
All entries into Nigeria are placed on red alert after the authorities confirm the first death from the Ebola virus in the capital Lagos.

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Sierra Leone Ebola escapee found

BBC Health: July 26, 2014
A Sierra Leone woman who went on the run after testing positive for the highly-contagious Ebola virus has turned herself in, health officials say.

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AUDIO: 'Heroin was a way to not face reality'

BBC Health: July 26, 2014
Former heroin addict Lisa Bryer tells Today programme presenter John Humphrys about her experiences with drugs and her recovery process.

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Well: Best Time of Day for a Testosterone Test

New York Times - Health: July 25, 2014
Testosterone levels may fluctuate throughout the day, but variations are most important only in men younger than 45.

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Well: Tomatoes All Summer Long

New York Times - Health: July 25, 2014
Summer tomatoes are flourishing, and they go well with a wide variety of foods. Some can be used to make marinara sauce to get you through the winter, and the rest can be enjoyed raw and cooked in salads, sauces for everything from fish to vegetables to eggs, and breads.

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Help! My Kid Is a Jerk!

WebMD: July 25, 2014
Your little angel can sometimes have obnoxious moments. If your kid is a jerk, find out from WebMD when it's just a phase and how you can teach better behavior.

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GE Healthcare, LLC, Single-Width Airway Modules (E-MiniC) and Accessories and Extension Modules (N-FC, N-FCREC): Class I Recall - CO2 Detector May Fail Leading to Injury

Safety Alerts: July 25, 2014
Physicians may make decisions based on incorrect values which could lead to permanent, irreversible impairment or life-threatening changes in patients.

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The New Old Age Blog: Addressing Caregivers’ Loss of Retirement Income

New York Times - Health: July 25, 2014
A congresswomen proposes Social Security credits for family caregivers who must cut back on work.

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Experiences at every stage of life contribute to cognitive abilities in old age

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 25, 2014
Early life experiences, such as childhood socioeconomic status and literacy, may have greater influence on the risk of cognitive impairment late in life than such demographic characteristics as race and ethnicity, a large study has found. "These findings are important," explained the lead author of the study "because it challenges earlier research that suggests associations between race and ethnicity, particularly among Latinos, and an increased risk of late-life cognitive impairment and dementia.

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Test increases odds of correct surgery for thyroid cancer patients

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 25, 2014
The routine use of a molecular testing panel increases the likelihood of performing the correct initial surgery for thyroid cancer patients by 30 percent, researchers report. "Before this test, about one in five potential thyroid cancer cases couldn't be diagnosed without an operation to remove a portion of the thyroid," said the lead author.

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Nanoparticle 'alarm clock' tested to awaken immune systems put to sleep by cancer

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 25, 2014
Researchers are exploring ways to wake up the immune system so it recognizes and attacks invading cancer cells. One pioneering approach uses nanoparticles to jumpstart the body’s ability to fight tumors. Nanoparticles are too small to imagine. One billion could fit on the head of a pin. This makes them stealthy enough to penetrate cancer cells with therapeutic agents such as antibodies, drugs, vaccine type viruses, or even metallic particles.

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Computerized ADHD testing

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 25, 2014
A new technology can now be utilized on patients called the Quotient® ADHD Test. t is FDA-cleared for the objective measurement of hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention, as an aid in the assessment of ADHD. ADHD is a common childhood condition characterized by more than normal difficulty with focus, behavior control, impulsivity and hyperactivity.

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Facing the Facts of Childhood Obesity

TEDMED - Medical Discussions: July 25, 2014
On Tuesday, as part of the Great Challenges program, we convened some of the nation’s top leaders in health and research around the topic of reducing childhood obesity. The conversation touched on the need for a multifaceted approach that includes action … Continue reading → The post Facing the Facts of Childhood Obesity appeared first on TEDMED Blog.

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