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Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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Home DNA Testing Kit

Simple as Spit! Home DNA Testing Kit Maps Your DNA

Simple home DNA kit allows you to find out what your DNA says about you
and your family. Find out what percent of your DNA comes from populations around the world, ranging from East Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and more. Break European ancestry down into distinct regions such as the British Isles, Scandinavia and Italy. People with mixed ancestry, African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans will also get a detailed breakdown.

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EBOLA Mask

Ebola Protective Masks Are In High Demand

With the outbreak of the Ebola virus, Ebola protective gear like masks are being bought up quickly. Historically when the threat of a pandemic hits the news, the "preparers" of the world stock up. One on the first line of defense is the Ebola mask. Learn more about what types of Ebola masks can protect you here.

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Medical News Headlines

Well: Why Antioxidants Don’t Belong in Your Workout

New York Times - Health: November 26, 2014
Antioxidant vitamins are enormously popular with people who exercise, but studies suggest they can blunt the benefits of exercise both on the jogging track and in the weight room.

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AP sources: Gov't to set stricter smog standard

Associated Press Healthwire: November 26, 2014
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The stricter smog standard proposed by the Obama administration joins a string of historic - and controversial - moves by the administration to improve air quality....

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The New Old Age Blog: Violence in the Nursing Home

New York Times - Health: November 25, 2014
One in five nursing home residents was involved in mistreatment of a neighbor in the previous month, a new study found.

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Long-term testosterone therapy does not increase risk of prostate cancer

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
Testosterone (T) therapy is routinely used in men with hypogonadism, a condition in which diminished function of the gonads occurs. Although there is no evidence that T therapy increases the risk of prostate cancer (PCa), there are still concerns and a paucity of long-term data. In a new study, investigators examined three parallel, prospective, ongoing, cumulative registry studies of over 1,000 men. Their analysis showed that long-term T therapy in hypogonadal men is safe and does not increase the risk of PCa.

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Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with gastric ulcers and cancer. To combat the infection, researchers developed LipoLLA, a therapeutic nanoparticle that contains linolenic acid, a component in vegetable oils. In mice, LipoLLA was safe and more effective against H. pylori infection than standard antibiotic treatments.

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What is Culinary Medicine? Q&A with John La Puma

TEDMED - Medical Discussions: November 25, 2014
Nutrition specialist, chef, author, and practicing physician John La Puma lives and works on an organic farm in California. He makes his garbanzo guacamole recipe on the TEDMED stage while sharing his philosophy that the food we eat is as … Continue reading → The post What is Culinary Medicine? Q&A with John La Puma appeared first on TEDMED Blog.

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Well: Vegetarian Thanksgiving: A Quinoa Stuffing

New York Times - Health: November 25, 2014
Vegans and non-vegans will enjoy this twist on a traditional stuffing, where quinoa replaces the bread and butternut squash, celeriac and hazelnuts add the flavors of fall.

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News in Brief: Week of Nov. 24-28

American Academy of Family Physicians: November 25, 2014
This roundup includes the following news briefs: Evidence Lacking to Recommend Vitamin D Screening in Adults; U.S. Skin Cancer Cases, Costs Rose From 2002 to 2011; Join CMS Call to Learn About Changes to Quality Reporting Programs; Surgeon General: Take a Family Health History During Holidays; and CMS Creates New Office, Appoints Chief Data Officer.

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Athletes' testosterone surges not tied to winning, study finds

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
A higher surge of testosterone in competition, the so-called 'winner effect,' is not actually related to winning, suggests a new study of intercollegiate cross country runners.

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Pathology specialist contributes to debate on breast cancer gene screening

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
What are the risks and benefits of screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the general adult population? An expert has published an invited commentary on this issue.

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E-health records used to search for hidden drug benefits

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
With research and development costs for many drugs reaching well into the billions, pharmaceutical companies want more than ever to determine whether their drugs already at market have any hidden therapeutic benefits that could warrant putting additional indications on the label and increase production.

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Superbug in SE Michigan shows recent decline

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
A new study finds a decrease in an emergent strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) that is resistant to last line defense antibiotics. Researchers examined the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) infections in southeastern Michigan, where the majority of these infections have occurred in the US.

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Trojan horse tactic gives parasites edge over immune systems

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
Parasites use Trojan horse subterfuge to suppress the immunity of their victims when causing infection, according to a study. Scientists have shown that parasites are able to secrete tiny sealed packages of genetic material into the cells of their victims, in order to suppress the immune response to infection.

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Patients at emergency departments regarded as 'symptoms,' researcher says

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
The healthcare work of providing care at Emergency departments is medicalized and result-driven. As a consequence of this, patients are regarded as “symptoms”, and are shunted around the department as “production units”, new research suggests.

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India Reports Bird Flu Virus in Kerala State

Scientific American: Health: November 25, 2014
India's report marks the first cases of the disease in the country since February this year, the World Organization for Animal Health said -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A 'hybrid vehicle' that delivers DNA

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
A new hybrid vehicle is under development. Its performance isn’t measured by the distance it travels, but rather the delivery of its cargo: vaccines that contain genetically engineered DNA to fight HIV, cancer, influenza and other maladies. The technology is a biomedical advancement that could help unleash the potential of DNA vaccines, which despite two decades of research, have yet to make a significant impact in the treatment of major illnesses.

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The problem with freezing stem cells

BBC Health: November 25, 2014
What went wrong with a cancer treatment that should have healed rather than harmed?

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CMS extends 2014 MU attestation deadline

Healthcare IT News: November 25, 2014
Offering a bit of leeway, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has pushed out the deadline for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals to attest to meaningful use for the 2014 reporting year, from Nov. 30 to Dec. 31. read more

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CMS extends 2014 MU attestation deadline

Healthcare IT News: November 25, 2014
Offering a bit of leeway, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid services has pushed out the deadline for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals to attest to meaningful use for the 2014 reporting year, from Nov. 30 to Dec. 31. read more

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New ONC chief privacy officer to speak at mHealth Privacy & Security Symposium

Healthcare IT News: November 25, 2014
Lucia Savage, who joined the National Coordinator for Health IT as chief privacy officer this past month, will join other top security officials from the HHS Office for Civil Rights and the U.S. read more

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New ONC chief privacy officer to speak at mHealth Privacy & Security Symposium

Healthcare IT News: November 25, 2014
Lucia Savage, who joined the National Coordinator for Health IT as chief privacy officer this past month, will join other top security officials from the HHS Office for Civil Rights and the U.S. read more

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Pain and itch in a dish: Scientists convert human skin cells into sensory neurons

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
Scientists have found a simple method to convert human skin cells into the specialized neurons that detect pain, itch, touch and other bodily sensations. These neurons are also affected by spinal cord injury and involved in Friedreich's ataxia, a devastating and currently incurable neurodegenerative disease that largely strikes children.

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FDA Announces New Calorie Rules for Restaurants

WebMD: November 25, 2014
The FDA announced new rules Tuesday that require chain restaurants and vending machine operators to post calories for food and drinks on their menus.

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Study maps how city neighborhoods affect diabetes risk

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
Public health researchers in Philadelphia looked at how neighborhood and community-level factors -- not just individual factors like diet, exercise and education -- influence people's diabetes risk. Their new study adds insight into the role of the physical and social environment on diabetes risk, zip code by zip code throughout the city.

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Barriers to public health data-sharing; life-saving solutions

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
Barriers to the sharing of public health data hamper decision-making efforts on local, national and global levels, and stymie attempts to contain emerging global health threats, an international team of researchers has announced.

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Few operations for epilepsy despite safety, efficacy

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
Epilepsy surgery is a safe, effective and low-risk procedure, research shows. Nevertheless, few Swedes have the operation, and those who are interested may have to wait a long time for presurgical counseling.

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Calcium-induced conformational changes of the regulatory domain of human mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carriers

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
Structures of human mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier regulatory domains reveal the nature of calcium-dependent conformational changes.

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Missing gene linked to autism

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
Researchers have shed light on a gene mutation linked to autistic traits. The team already knew that some people with autism were deficient in a gene called neurexin-II. To investigate whether the gene was associated with autism symptoms, the Leeds team studied mice with the same defect. They found behavioral features that were similar to autism symptoms, including a lack of sociability or interest in other mice.

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Gene linked to tamoxifen-resistant breast cancers

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
After mining the genetic records of thousands of breast cancer patients, researchers have identified a gene whose presence may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used hormone treatment generally used after surgery, radiation and other chemotherapy.

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Alzheimer's in a dish model converts skin cells to induced neurons expressing amyloid-beta and tau

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
The search for a living laboratory model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) — the so-called “Alzheimer’s in a dish” —has a new candidate. Researchers report success in creating induced neurons that model Alzheimer’s by starting with fibroblasts taken from skin biopsies.

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How environment contributes to several human diseases

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
Using a new imaging technique, researchers have found that the biological machinery that builds DNA can insert molecules into the DNA strand that are damaged as a result of environmental exposures. These damaged molecules trigger cell death that produces some human diseases, according to the researchers. The work provides a possible explanation for how one type of DNA damage may lead to cancer, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular and lung disease, and Alzheimer’s disease.

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Researchers Identify Genetic Markers That May Predispose Individuals for Kidney Injury

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: November 25, 2014
Researchers have identified genetic markers that may help to identify individuals at risk for acute kidney injury (AKI) in the hospital setting. The study offers new clues about the development of AKI and could lead to potential therapeutic interventions.

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Giving #HITthanks: Share your health IT gratitude!

Healthcare IT News: November 25, 2014
A year without negative or challenging headlines would be an unreal one. Life always has challenges, just as health IT does. Here are just a few sample headlines of the challenges with electronic health records, interoperability, and patient engagement: read more

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Giving #HITthanks: Share your health IT gratitude!

Healthcare IT News: November 25, 2014
A year without negative or challenging headlines would be an unreal one. Life always has challenges, just as health IT does. Here are just a few sample headlines of the challenges with electronic health records, interoperability, and patient engagement: read more

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How to Hijack A Cell

Scientific American: Health: November 25, 2014
Taking control of cells by squeezing them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tales from Survivors of Japan's Earthquake, Tsunami and Fukushima Nuclear Disaster

Scientific American: Health: November 25, 2014
Two journalists combine history, science and storytelling to recount the experiences of those who experienced the magnitude 9.0 earthquake that struck Japan in 2011 and its aftermath -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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