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Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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Home DNA Testing Kit

Simple as Spit! Home DNA Testing Kit Maps Your DNA

Simple home DNA kit allows you to find out what your DNA says about you and your family. Find out what percent of your DNA comes from populations around the world, ranging from East Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and more. Break European ancestry down into distinct regions such as the British Isles, Scandinavia and Italy. People with mixed ancestry, African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans will also get a detailed breakdown.

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EBOLA Mask

Ebola Protective Masks Are In High Demand

With the outbreak of the Ebola virus, Ebola protective gear like masks are being bought up quickly. Historically when the threat of a pandemic hits the news, the "preparers" of the world stock up. One on the first line of defense is the Ebola mask. Learn more about what types of Ebola masks can protect you here.

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Medical News Headlines

Donate Your Health Data To Medical Science

Scientific American: Health: March 30, 2015
You can now share your genome, health and microbiome info and viral infection data to crowdsourced medical research projects. Cynthia Graber reports.   -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Doctor's World: Parsing Ronald Reagan’s Words for Early Signs of Alzheimer’s

New York Times - Health: March 30, 2015
Researchers find subtle indications of dementia in transcripts of the former president’s news conferences.

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Well: Ask Well: Jet Crash Raises Questions on Mental Illness Risks

New York Times - Health: March 30, 2015
Dr. Richard Friedman, a professor of clinical psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College, will be responding to reader questions about depression and its risks.

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Why getting patients on their feet may speed recovery in ICU

Associated Press Healthwire: March 30, 2015
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The intensive care unit is a last frontier for physical therapy: It's hard to exercise patients hooked to ventilators so they can breathe....

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Fasting and less-toxic cancer drug may work as well as chemotherapy

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
Fasting in combination with chemotherapy has already been shown to kill cancer cells, but a pair of new studies in mice suggests that a less-toxic class of drugs combined with fasting may kill breast, colorectal and lung cancer cells equally well.

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Books: A World Shared With H.I.V.

New York Times - Health: March 30, 2015
David Quammen takes readers to the disease’s origins, while Dr. Susan C. Ball recalls the devastation, and the heroically humane care it spawned.

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Mechanisms that link compulsive binge eating with hypertension identified

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
An estimated eight million adults in the U.S. suffer from binge eating disorder. Now, researchers have shown that compulsive binging on foods that are high in fat and sugar can trigger specific molecular changes that can lead to high blood pressure (hypertension). While others have studied the effects of binge eating on the brain, this study is the first to look at its molecular effects on the expression of certain proteins in the body.

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Rate of opioid misuse is around 25 percent, addiction rate 10 percent, reports study

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
New estimates suggest that 20 to 30 percent of opioid analgesic drugs prescribed for chronic pain are misused, while the rate of opioid addiction is approximately 10 percent. "On average, misuse was documented in approximately one out of four or five patients and addiction in approximately one out of ten or eleven patients," who were prescribed opioids as part of their treatment for chronic pain, write researchers. They note extremely wide variation in reported rates of misuse, abuse, and addiction and raise questions about the benefits of widespread opioid use for chronic pain, given the harmful consequences.

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Well: Endometriosis Is Often Ignored in Teenage Girls

New York Times - Health: March 30, 2015
Debilitating pain, internal bleeding and even infertility may result when the condition is overlooked or played down by physicians.

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Oxygen therapy in COPD patients associated with burn injury

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease receiving home oxygen have a higher risk of burn injury, a study shows. Physicians prescribing oxygen to patients with COPD struggle to balance the benefits with the risk of fire hazard in patients who continue to smoke. The number of active smokers prescribed oxygen is estimated to be 15 to 25 percent. Having heat source or flame near oxygen gas can ignite a fire.

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Crowdsourced tool for depression

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
A new peer-to-peer networking tool has been developed that enables sufferers of anxiety and depression to build online support communities and practice therapeutic techniques.

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Study debunks common misconception that urine is sterile

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
Bacteria have been discovered in the bladders of healthy women, discrediting the common belief that normal urine is sterile. "While traditional urine cultures have been the gold standard to identify urine disorders in the past, they do not detect most bacteria and have limited utility as a result," a researcher said. "They are not as comprehensive as the testing techniques used in this study."

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Colliding Black Holes and the Dawn of Gravitational Astronomy

Discovery Health: March 30, 2015
New simulations of the most energetic collisions in the universe are helping astrophysicists understand how gravitational waves are generated, possibly giving us an exciting glimpse into the future of gravitational astronomy.

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Component of red grapes, wine could help ease depression

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
A link between inflammation and depression, which affects approximately 148 million people in the United States, has been identified by researchers. A new study finds that resveratrol -- a natural anti-inflammatory agent found in the skin of red grapes -- can prevent inflammation as well as depression-related behaviors in rodents exposed to a social stress.

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Landslides Strike Flood-Hit Indian Kashmir

Discovery Health: March 30, 2015
Landslides in Indian Kashmir led to six deaths, as hundreds fled their homes after flooding triggered by heavy rain.

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The Condition Cancer Research Is In

New York Times - Health: March 30, 2015
Dr. Harold Varmus, the departing director of the National Cancer Institute, addresses funding challenges and the state of the fight against the disease.

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Are Psoriasis and Allergies Linked?

WebMD: March 30, 2015
Psoriasis and allergies both cause itchy, skin and both involve immune system reactions. Could they be related?

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Well: Profiling the Distracted Driver: Young, Female and Solo

New York Times - Health: March 30, 2015
People under 25 are more than four times as likely as older people to use a cellphone while driving, a new study reports.

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DNews: Why Trees Can't Grow on Mountaintops

Discovery Health: March 30, 2015
Ever look at the tree line on a mountain? It's all trees, trees, trees, and then -- Zfft! The party ends. Why does "Zfft!" have to happen? What determines the elevation beyond which trees just can't get the job done?

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Setting a dinner table for wildlife can affect their risk of disease

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
Supplemental feeding of wildlife can increase the spread of some infectious diseases and decrease the spread of others. A new study by ecologists finds that the outcome depends on the type of pathogen and the source of food. The findings have implications for human health and wildlife conservation, and contain practical suggestions for wildlife disease management and a roadmap for future study.

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To stop cancer: Block its messages

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
A potential drug molecule has been discovered that stops cancer cells, but not healthy ones, from getting their 'mail.' The average living cell needs communication skills: It must transmit a constant stream of messages quickly and efficiently from its outer walls to the inner nucleus, where most of the day-to-day decisions are made. But this rapid, long-distance communication system leaves itself open to mutations that can give rise to a "spam attack" that promotes cancer, the researchers say.

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Worked-based wellness programs reduce weight

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
Workplace wellness programs can be effective in helping people lose weight by providing healthier food choices and increasing opportunities for physical activity, particularly if these efforts are designed with the input and active participation of employees, a new study confirms. The two-year project successfully reduced the number or people considered overweight or obese by almost 9 percent.

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'Pay-for-performance' may lead to higher risk for robotic prostate surgery patients

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
A 'perverse disincentive' for hospitals that have invested in expensive technology for robotic surgery may be jeopardizing prostate cancer patients who seek out the procedure, concluded a new study. The study, which compared complication rates in hospitals with low volumes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomies to institutions with high volumes of the procedure, suggested that current pay-for-performance healthcare models are to blame.

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Early stage NSCLC patients with low tumor metabolic activity have longer survival

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
Low pre-surgery uptake of a labeled glucose analogue, a marker of metabolic activity, in the primary tumor of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer is associated with increased overall survival and a longer time before tumor recurrence, a study shows. Patients with high labeled glucose uptake may benefit from additional therapy following surgery.

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Odds of reversing ICU patients' prior preferences to forgo life-sustaining therapies vary widely across the U.S.

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
Intensive care units across the United States vary widely in how they manage the care of patients who have set preexisting limits on life-sustaining therapies, such as authorizing do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders and prohibiting interventions such as feeding tubes or dialysis, according to new research.

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Gecko Skin Is Surprisingly Un-Sticky

Discovery Health: March 30, 2015
Geckos may have the ability to stick to walls, but it seems that not much sticks to them.

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Hunting for Exomoons That May Host Alien Life

Discovery Health: March 30, 2015
The search for alien life doesn't end within the boundaries of our solar system. Scientists are now search for moons orbiting alien planets that might play host to extraterrestrial life.

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Ancient Egyptian Beer-Making Vessels Found in Israel

Discovery Health: March 30, 2015
The excavation is the first to offer evidence of an Egyptian occupation in the center of Tel Aviv 5,000 years ago.

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Global Health: Fluoridated Water Helps Older Adults Keep Teeth, Study Says

New York Times - Health: March 30, 2015
But the research from Ireland found that fluoridation had no effect on overall bone density in adults older than 50.

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Opossum Compounds Isolated to Help Make Antivenom

Scientific American: Health: March 30, 2015
And researchers have engineered a common bacteria to inexpensively create the snakebite treatment -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Indiana Races to Fight H.I.V. Surge Tied to Drug Abuse

New York Times - Health: March 30, 2015
The worst outbreak in Indiana’s history, which stems largely from the intravenous use of the prescription painkiller Opana, has prompted a whirlwind response effort.

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Could antibodies from camels protect humans from MERS?

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
Antibodies from dromedary camels protected uninfected mice from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and helped infected mice expunge the disease, according to a study.

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Endoscopes linked to outbreak of drug-resistant e. Coli

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
An outbreak of a novel Escherichia coli (E.coli) strain resistant to antibiotics has been linked to contaminated endoscopes in a Washington state hospital. The study indicates that industry standard cleaning guidelines, which were exceeded by hospital staff, may not be sufficient for sterilizing endoscopes adequately.

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Short bouts of high-intensity exercise before a fatty meal best for vascular health

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: March 30, 2015
A short burst of intensive exercise before eating a high fat meal is better for blood vessel function in young people than the currently recommended moderate-intensity exercise, according to a new study. Cardiovascular diseases including heart attacks and stroke a leading cause of death, and the process underlying these diseases start in youth. An impairment in the function of blood vessels is thought to be the earliest event in this process, and this is known to occur in the hours after consuming a high fat meal.

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