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New Fitbit

Have you seen the NEW Fitbits?

Fitbit has come a long way and continues to be the top fitness tracker. And now, it is seen as an eye catching fashion accessory and a fitness bling statement. Fitbit's newest models are now at the intersection of advanced health tracking and high end fashion. Fitbit has accomplished the combination of beautiful design and personal health information. Check out the new wrist candy and all the cool features it has to offer here >> See the HOTTEST new Fitbits!

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Awaken Your Sleeping Beauty With This Sleep Tracker

Sleep is the new hot topic and from what science tells us, it is the holy grail of health. If you can track it, you can optimize it. If you can optimize it, you can benefit from it. This hot new sleep tracker by Hello is the perfect sleep tracker for the perfect price. There is beauty in health, and it needs to be awakened. But before that, let's get the best sleep of our lives. If your VR headset lenses have stopped fogging up, you can learn more here: Sense Sleep Tracker on Amazon

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Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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Medical News Headlines

Mosquitoes Learn the Smell of Danger

Scientific American: Health: February 22, 2018
The bloodsuckers lose their appetite for attractive scents when they associate those aromas with a likelihood of being swatted. Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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U.S. health officials reverse stance on AstraZeneca's flu vaccine

Reuters Health News: February 21, 2018
(Reuters) - AstraZeneca Plc said on Wednesday an advisory committee of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the use of its FluMist Quadrivalent vaccine in the upcoming flu season, reversing its earlier position.

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After-effects not necessarily reduced with robotic prostate surgery

Reuters Health News: February 21, 2018
(Reuters Health) - Men with prostate cancer who get the gland removed may be just as likely to suffer after-effects like erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence with robotic surgery as with other operations, a UK study suggests.

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FDA Cracks Down on Kratom Products

WebMD: February 21, 2018
Kratom -- a plant that grows in Asia -- poses serious health risks, according to the FDA. Earlier this month, the agency declared that kratom acts like an opioid in the human brain.

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Opioids Tied to Risk of Fatal Infections

New York Times - Well: February 21, 2018
People with invasive pneumococcal disease were 62 percent more likely to be using opioids.

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Working Nights May Raise Diabetes Risk

New York Times - Well: February 21, 2018
The more often people worked nights, the more likely they were to have Type 2 diabetes.

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7 Beliefs of Emotionally Healthy People

Scientific American: Health: February 21, 2018
Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen reveals 7 big beliefs healthy people share -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Primary care group uses population health IT to help prevent colon cancer

Healthcare IT News: February 21, 2018
The national average colorectal screening rate is 39 percent but at Albany Area Primary Health Care it's 60 percent.

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ODH teams with Hashed Health, aiming to bring blockchain to accountable care

Healthcare IT News: February 21, 2018
The analytics company will lead Hashed Health's Value-Based Care Working Group, exploring ways blockchain can help improve quality measures.

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India doctors remove world's 'largest brain tumour'

BBC Health: February 21, 2018
The patient had been living for three years with the 1.8kg tumour, which was larger than his head.

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Venezuelans report big weight losses in 2017 as hunger hits

Reuters Health News: February 21, 2018
CARACAS (Reuters) - Venezuelans reported losing on average 11 kilograms (24 lbs) in body weight last year and almost 90 percent now live in poverty, according to a new university study on the impact of a devastating economic crisis and food shortages.

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More Sanderson Farms investors support end of antibiotic use

Reuters Health News: February 21, 2018
(Reuters) - More Sanderson Farms Inc investors supported a shareholder proposal this year urging the third-largest U.S. poultry producer to stop giving medically important antibiotics to healthy chickens for disease prevention.

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TV trauma cases don’t look much like real life

Reuters Health News: February 21, 2018
(Reuters Health) - Fans of the television show “Grey’s Anatomy” may be getting the wrong idea about what happens in trauma cases - and that could create unrealistic expectations in the real world, a U.S. study suggests.

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Sea urchins can drill holes in solid rock with just their teeth

New Scientist Health News: February 21, 2018
If a sea urchin can't find a suitable pit to live in, it makes one – even if it has to spend months gnawing away at hard granite

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Panther Senses: How Racial Literacy Makes It Possible for Our Children to Keep Belonging Without Having to Fit In

TEDMED - Medical Discussions: February 21, 2018
Written and submitted by Howard Stevenson, Ph.D.. Howard C. Stevenson is Director of the Racial Empowerment Collaborative (REC). Howard is also the Constance Clayton Professor of Urban Education and Professor of Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education. Howard spoke on the TEDMED stage in 2017, and you can watch his … Continue reading "Panther Senses: How Racial Literacy Makes It Possible for Our Children to Keep Belonging Without Having to Fit In" The post Panther Senses: How Racial Literacy Makes It Possible for Our Children to Keep Belonging Without Having to Fit In appeared first on TEDMED Blog.

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When it comes to climate change, a tantrum is just what we need

New Scientist Health News: February 21, 2018
We can’t wait for the next generation to solve the problem of climate change but today’s kids can still be a big force for change, says Michael E. Mann

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Some In Pain Can Cut Opioids and Still Get Relief

WebMD: February 21, 2018
The researchers found that length of time on opioids didn't affect people's success at reducing the drugs. Neither did the dose they took prior to the study.

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Securing a child's future needs to start during parents' teen years

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy -- even going back to adolescence -- according to a new paper.

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New interaction mechanism of proteins discovered

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown way in which proteins interact with one another and cells organize themselves. This new mechanism involves two fully unstructured proteins forming an ultra-high-affinity complex due to their opposite net charge. Proteins usually bind one another as a result of perfectly matching shapes in their three-dimensional structures.

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Novel mechanism behind schizophrenia uncovered

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
Researchers have uncovered a novel mechanism in which a protein--neuregulin 3--controls how key neurotransmitters are released in the brain during schizophrenia. The protein is elevated in people with schizophrenia and other severe mental illnesses, but the study is the first to investigate how it causes such severe mental illness.

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Cross-bred flies reveal new clues about how proteins are regulated

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
The investigators used a technique called bottom-up proteomics (sometimes called shotgun proteomics) to reveal which proteins of each species were present in the hybrid flies.

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Ancient-DNA researchers surpass the 1,000-genome milestone

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
In the last eight years, the field of ancient DNA research has expanded from just one ancient human genome to more than 1,300. The latest 625 of those genomes debut Feb. 21 in Nature, including the largest study of ancient DNA to date.

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Unexpected discovery about essential enzyme

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
The enzyme that produces DNA building blocks plays an important role when cells divide. In a new study, researchers have discovered for the first time that the so-called master switch of the enzyme can change locations -- while still performing the same task.

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Blacks May Face Higher Stroke Risk From AFib

WebMD: February 21, 2018
New research finds that the risk of stroke is much higher in black Americans with afib than in whites with the condition.

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We do not know for sure how dark or light Cheddar Man’s skin was

New Scientist Health News: February 21, 2018
The headline was that an ancient Briton from 10,000 years ago had dark skin, but the genetics of skin colour are so complex that we can’t be sure

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We can now squeeze a molecule and turn it into one that we want

New Scientist Health News: February 21, 2018
We can now precisely tweak molecular structures just by squeezing them - a technique that could let us efficiently build custom drug compounds on the cheap

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France wants to have 500 wolves roaming its countryside

New Scientist Health News: February 21, 2018
The number of wolves in France will be allowed to increase by 40 per cent, as wilderness continues its return to Europe

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Trigger warnings are taking over universities, but do they work?

New Scientist Health News: February 21, 2018
Talk of trigger warnings and microaggressions are sweeping through university campuses, but some researchers question whether they have any psychological basis

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Pew, HIMSS press ONC to modify planned trusted exchange framework to ensure interoperability

Healthcare IT News: February 21, 2018
Organizations say that ONC should more closely align TEFCA with interoperability work already happening and relax requirements to avoid disruptive setbacks.

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An improved anti-addiction medication

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
Drug addiction continues to plague vast numbers of people across the world, destroying and ending lives, while attempts to develop more effective pharmaceutical addiction treatments continue. Scientists now report the development of a potent new medicine to fight addiction, which might also be an effective treatment for epilepsy and other conditions.

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Zika virus could help combat brain cancer

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
Researchers show that infection by Zika caused death of cells from glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive kind of malignant brain tumor in adults. Scientists foresee the use of genetic engineering to neutralize Zika virus' infectious whilst preserving the viral particles which induce the death of tumoral cells.

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Bacteria produce more substances than hitherto assumed

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
The bacterium Streptomyces chartreusis is an antibiotic-producing bacterium that releases more metabolites into the surrounding medium than scientists assumed based on the analysis of the genome. Many of the substances are likely released to mediate interactions with its environment. They might also include molecules that are of interest as potential pharmaceutical agents. A research team analysed a broad spectrum of the bacterium's metabolic products under various culture conditions.

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Creative couples' intervention significantly helps people with Alzheimer's communicate

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
For couples with decades of shared memories, a partner's decline in the ability to communicate because of dementia is frightening and frustrating. Communication strategies they've used before simply don't work anymore. By getting creative, an in-home intervention to support couples affected by dementia is showing that 'practice does make perfect,' both for the caregiver and the care receiver or person with dementia, and can improve their communication behaviors in just 10 weeks.

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Haloperidol does not prevent delirium or improve survival rates in ICU patients

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
Prophylactic use of the drug haloperidol does not help to prevent delirium in intensive care patients or improve their chances of survival. Therefore, there is no reason anymore to administer the drug as a preventive measure to reduce the burden of delirium. This was revealed following a three-year, large-scale study among 1,800 patients in 20 Dutch ICUs.

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Minimising risks of transplants

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
A bone marrow transplant is often the only therapy available to save leukaemia patients, but the risk of complications is high. Nearly half of all patients experience an unwanted reaction of their immune system, which often attacks their skin and liver and in up to 50 percent of cases the intestines. Researchers have succeeded in deciphering what causes this in some instances life-threatening inflammation of the intestines.

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Depression linked to reduced arginine levels

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: February 21, 2018
People suffering from major depressive disorder, MDD, have reduced arginine levels, a new study shows.

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