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Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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The Art of Lip Injections

The Secret Art of Natural Lip Injections

Is there a secret art to lip enhancement? You surely know when you've seen someone and immediately reacted, "she had her lips done!". What about the lips that have been filled, look terrific, and you don't know they've been enhanced with filler? That's the secret art to lip fillers and that is why it is critical to select a physician injector who knows the secrets. What are the secrets to getting great lip enhancements? First, experience! Second, the artist within! The injector must also understand the complex, and sometimes unforgiving, anatomy of the lips. These artistic and technical demands explain why so many patients receive sub-standard lip injections and are left with unnatural results. Patients often believe that lip enhancement always leads to unnatural, over-filled results; in actuality, this should never occur in experienced hands.

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PSA Screenings Decline

PSA Screenings Decline Following New Recommendations

The Journal of Urology reports that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing has declined in the United States following a 2013 recommendation by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)—a group of primary care physicians charged with developing recommendations about which preventative health screenings should be covered under the Affordable Health Care Act.

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Medical News Headlines

Experts denounce clinical trials of unscientific, 'alternative' medicines

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Experts call for an end to clinical trials of 'highly implausible treatments' such as homeopathy and reiki. Over the last two decades, such complementary and alternative medicine treatments have been embraced in medical academia despite budget constraints and the fact that they rest on dubious science, they say.

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Scientists learn more about rare skin cancer that killed Bob Marley

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Acral melanomas, the rare type of skin cancer that caused musician Bob Marley’s death, are genetically distinct from other types of skin cancer. Acral melanoma most often affects the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, nail-beds and other hairless parts of the skin. Unlike other more common types of melanoma, it's not caused by UV damage from the sun.

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In Liberia, a Child Thought to Have Ebola

New York Times - Health: August 20, 2014
The 10-year-old boy, found without his family, was eventually transported to a hospital in Monrovia.

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Children's hospital 'must improve'

BBC Health: August 20, 2014
Alder Hey Children's Hospital "requires improvement" in critical care and outpatient services, but some areas are rated outstanding or good by health inspectors.

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Well: Feeding Your Canine Athlete

New York Times - Health: August 20, 2014
Humans and dogs fuel exercise very differently. So if you’re taking your dog out for a run, take note.

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What Is Your Gut Telling You?

WebMD: August 20, 2014
What gut bacteria says about your health.

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Well: Instant Noodles Tied to Heart Risk

New York Times - Health: August 20, 2014
Women who ate instant noodles at least twice a week were 68 percent more likely to have metabolic syndrome.

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Sepsis: Antibiotics 'not working'

BBC Health: August 20, 2014
Patients are dying from sepsis because of a lack of effective antibiotics, an expert is warning.

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Newborn screening expansion offers early diagnosis and treatment to infants with SCID

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Data from 11 newborn screening programs showed that newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully implemented across public health newborn screening programs. SCID babies are born without a developed immune system and are subject to a wide variety of life-threatening infections.

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Teen sleeplessness piles on risk for obesity

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Teenagers who don't get enough sleep may wake up to worse consequences than nodding off during chemistry class. According to new research, risk of being obese by age 21 was 20 percent higher among 16-year-olds who got less than six hours of sleep a night, compared with their peers who slumbered more than eight hours.

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Severe infections with hospitalization after prostate biopsy rising in Sweden

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy is the gold standard for detecting prostate cancer, but international reports have suggested that the number of risks associated with the procedure is increasing. In a new nationwide population-based study, Swedish researchers found that six percent of men filled a prescription for antibiotics for a urinary tract infection within 30 days after having a prostate biopsy, with a twofold increase in hospital admissions over five years.

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Test reliably detects inherited immune deficiency in newborns

National Institutes of Health: August 20, 2014
NIH-supported study suggests that early diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency leads to high survival rates.

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Novel gene predicts both breast cancer relapse, response to chemotherapy

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Scientists have made it easier to predict both breast cancer relapses and responses to chemotherapy, through the identification of a unique gene. The newly found marker could help doctors classify each breast cancer patient and customize a treatment regimen that is more effective.

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Gene therapy protects mice from lethal heart condition, researchers find

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
A new gene therapy has been shown to protect mice from a life-threatening heart condition caused by muscular dystrophy. About one in 3,500 children, mostly boys, are born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). They experience a progressive wasting away of muscles, starting in the legs and pelvis. Children with DMD have difficulty walking, and most need wheelchairs by age 12.

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Senate open data request hits a nerve

Healthcare IT News: August 20, 2014
Comments from the Premier healthcare alliance this week are just the latest in a flood of opinions and wish lists inundating Capitol Hill, after two senators asked for input on interoperability and data sharing. [See also: Grassley, Wyden call for more Medicare claims data transparency] read more

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Coronary arteries hold heart-regenerating cells

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Endothelial cells residing in the coronary arteries can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue, investigators have discovered. The heart has long been considered to be an organ without regenerative potential, said one expert. Recent findings, however, have demonstrated that new heart muscle cells are generated at a low rate, suggesting the presence of cardiac stem cells. The source of these cells was unknown.

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Treating pain by blocking the 'chili-pepper receptor'

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Biting into a chili pepper causes a burning spiciness that is irresistible to some, but intolerable to others. Scientists exploring the chili pepper's effect are using their findings to develop a new drug candidate for many kinds of pain, which can be caused by inflammation or other problems. They have now reported their progress on the compound, which is being tested in clinical trials.

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Sunblock poses potential hazard to sea life

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
The sweet and salty aroma of sunscreen and seawater signals a relaxing trip to the shore. But scientists are now reporting that the idyllic beach vacation comes with an environmental hitch. When certain sunblock ingredients wash off skin and into the sea, they can become toxic to some of the ocean's tiniest inhabitants, which are the main course for many other marine animals.

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Diabetes calculator helps identify patients at risk of disease

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
A new online tool will help doctors predict which patients are most likely to develop diabetes. Experts say it could offer a cost-effective way to identify people with diabetes, as it avoids the need for significant investment in screening.

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Investigational therapy focuses on slowing progression in mild to moderate Alzheimer's

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease currently have no treatment options to slow brain cell deterioration. Researchers are studying an investigational drug that proposes to do just that.

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mHealth takes on diabetes

Healthcare IT News: August 20, 2014
Boston's Joslin Diabetes Center is using an mHealth platform to help diabetics and their caregivers control a potentially fatal side-effect of the disease. read more

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Teen Birth Rate Has Dropped Dramatically in Last Two Decades: CDC

WebMD: August 20, 2014
4 million fewer births attributed to less sex, more contraception, but U.S. rate still higher than comparable nations

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Community centers bullish on EHRs

Healthcare IT News: August 20, 2014
Electronic health records are now a fact of life in federally-funded community health centers, with nearly all of the centers using EHRs in some or all their sites in 2013, according to the latest data from the Health Resources and Services Administration. read more

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Tweets Identify Food Poisoning Outbreaks

Scientific American: Health: August 20, 2014
In Chicago, monitoring Twitter for reports of food poisoning led to 133 restaurant inspections for health violations, with 21 establishments shut down. Dina Fine Maron reports.   -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Helping Out at Home

NIH Medline Plus: August 20, 2014
Source: HealthDay - Related MedlinePlus Pages: Caregivers, Family Issues, Seniors' Health

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How to get started with ICD-10 testing

Healthcare IT News: August 20, 2014
http://www.icd10watch.com/blog/how-get-started-with-icd-10-testing

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Economic disparities impact infant health, experts show

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Women who are poor experience higher cortisol levels in pregnancy and give birth to infants with elevated levels of the stress hormone, putting them at greater risk for serious disease later in life, according to a new research. "By improving the health and well-being of socially disadvantaged women you may help to improve the health and well-being of their children and therefore society overall," the lead researcher said.

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Repeat emergency department visits for acute heart failure suggest need for better outpatient care

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Almost one-third of acute heart failure syndrome patients seen in hospital emergency departments in one American study during 2010 had ED visits during the following year, findings that suggest a lack of appropriate outpatient care. The authors note that acute heart failure syndrome (AHFS) -- an increase in symptoms that requires urgent care -- accounts for more than 675,000 ED visits and one million hospitalizations in the U.S. each year, incurring around $31 million in costs.

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Review of clinical treatment of bronchiolitis in infants reveals over-reliance on one test

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
The importance of physicians using all available clinical assessment tools when considering how to treat patients is the focus of a new article. The study examined how pediatric emergency medicine physicians treat a respiratory tract infection called bronchiolitis in infants, and how they incorporate factors such as respiratory exam, imaging tools and blood tests when deciding on treatment.

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Is China's 50 percent cesarean section delivery rate too high?

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Efforts must be made to decrease China's increasing cesarean section rate, suggests a new article. China has one of the highest caesarean delivery rates in the world. Of 16 million babies born in 2010, approximately half were by caesarean. Although the exact rate is not known, the current Chinese language literature on caesarean rates in China reports total caesarean rates ranging from 36% to 58%. However, before the 1980s, the caesarean rate was below 5% and it did not rise above 10% until after 1990.

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Type-1, type-2 diabetes caused by same underlying mechanism? Toxic clumps of hormone amylin may be to blame

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
New findings provide compelling evidence that juvenile-onset or type-1 diabetes and type-2 diabetes are both caused by the formation of toxic clumps of a hormone called amylin. The results suggest that type-1 and type-2 diabetes could both be slowed down and potentially reversed by medicines that stop amylin forming these toxic clumps.

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Untangling DNA: The channel that relaxes DNA

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
A simple and effective way of unraveling the often tangled mass of DNA is to “thread” the strand into a nano-channel. A new study used simulations to measure the characteristics that this channel should have in order to achieve maximum efficiency.

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Progress in the fight against harmful fungi

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
One of the world's largest gene libraries for the Candida glabrata yeast, which is harmful to humans, has been developed by researchers. Molecular analysis of the Candida glabrata fungus mutations led to the discovery of 28 new genes that are partly responsible for the yeast's tolerance of common drugs. Infectious diseases caused by fungi, viruses, bacteria and parasites represent the world's number one cause of death. A few dozen types of harmful fungi claim more than 1.5 million human lives every year.

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Zipper action triggers bacterial invasion: Scientists discover new strategy germs use to invade cells

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
The hospital germ Pseudomonas aeruginosa wraps itself into the membrane of human cells. Now researchers have identified a novel mechanism of bacterial invasion, outlining how Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses lipids in the cell membrane to make its way into host cells.

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Novel oral anticoagulant prescriptions soar, but at a high cost

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Warfarin, the longtime standard treatment for atrial fibrillation, is facing competition from new options in the anticoagulant drug marketplace including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban. A new study documents the rapid adoption of these novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) into clinical practice. By mid-2013 NOACs accounted for 62% of all new anticoagulant prescriptions yet this represents 98% of total anticoagulant-related drug costs.

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Providing futile treatment prevents other patients from receiving the critical care they need

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 20, 2014
Providing futile treatment in the intensive care unit sets off a chain reaction that causes other ill patients needing medical attention to wait for critical care beds, according to a study. The study is the first to show that when unbeneficial medical care is provided, others who might be able to benefit from treatment are harmed, said the study's lead author.

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