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Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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The Art of Lip Injections

The Secret Art of Natural Lip Injections

Is there a secret art to lip enhancement? You surely know when you've seen someone and immediately reacted, "she had her lips done!". What about the lips that have been filled, look terrific, and you don't know they've been enhanced with filler? That's the secret art to lip fillers and that is why it is critical to select a physician injector who knows the secrets. What are the secrets to getting great lip enhancements? First, experience! Second, the artist within! The injector must also understand the complex, and sometimes unforgiving, anatomy of the lips. These artistic and technical demands explain why so many patients receive sub-standard lip injections and are left with unnatural results. Patients often believe that lip enhancement always leads to unnatural, over-filled results; in actuality, this should never occur in experienced hands.

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EBOLA Mask

Ebola Protective Masks Are In High Demand

With the outbreak of the Ebola virus, Ebola protective gear like masks are being bought up quickly. Historically when the threat of a pandemic hits the news, the "preparers" of the world stock up. One on the first line of defense is the Ebola mask. Learn more about what types of Ebola masks can protect you here.

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Medical News Headlines

NIH to admit Texas nurse diagnosed with Ebola virus

National Institutes of Health: October 22, 2014
NIH is taking every precaution to ensure the safety of our patients, NIH staff, and the public.

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Ancient Europeans intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
By analyzing DNA from petrous bones of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices. The scientific team examined nuclear ancient DNA extracted from thirteen individuals from burials from archaeological sites in the Great Hungarian Plain. The skeletons sampled date from 5,700 BC (Early Neolithic) to 800 BC (Iron Age).

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Fight against Alzheimer's disease: New research on walnuts

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
An new animal study reveals potential brain-health benefits of a walnut-enriched diet. Researchers suggest that a diet including walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, slowing the progression of, or preventing Alzheimer’s disease.

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Animal therapy reduces anxiety, loneliness symptoms in college students

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
Animal-assisted therapy can reduce symptoms of anxiety and loneliness among college students, according to researchers who provided animal-assisted therapy to 55 students in a group setting at a small arts college. They found a 60 percent decrease in self-reported anxiety and loneliness symptoms following animal-assisted therapy, in which a registered therapy dog was under the supervision of a licensed mental health practitioner.

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Screening questions fail to identify teens at risk for hearing loss

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers. Their study results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions.

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Seven ways to feel full without overeating

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
Not feeling full after or between meals can result in overeating. Eating certain nutrients and foods may help curb appetite and keep one feeling fuller longer, according to an expert.

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Taking the Fear and Dread Out of Prostate Cancer

Medical Web Times: October 21, 2014
Married 24 years, Frank and Sherry Peugh still celebrate their wedding anniversary on the 27th of every month. “I get up, I don’t even know what day it is and I walk into the kitchen and find a little gift in front of the coffee pot,” Sherry marvels. It’s been this way for “277 months,” Frank [...]

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The Creative Gifts of ADHD

Scientific American: Health: October 21, 2014
“Just because a diagnosis [of ADHD] can be made does not take away from the great traits we love about Calvin and his imaginary tiger friend, Hobbes. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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WHO: Ebola vaccine trials in W. Africa in January

Associated Press Healthwire: October 21, 2014
GENEVA (AP) -- Tens of thousands of doses of experimental Ebola vaccines could be available for "real-world" testing in West Africa as soon as January as long as they are deemed safe, a top World Health Organization official said Tuesday....

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Well: It’s Time to Try Nutty, Sour Trahana

New York Times - Health: October 21, 2014
No matter which type of trahana you use, I think you will want it in your pantry once you have tried it.

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NHS reputation 'dragged through mud'

BBC Health: October 21, 2014
Health Minister Mark Drakeford launches a stinging attack on the Conservatives for trying to drag the reputation of the Welsh NHS "through the mud" for "partisan political purposes".

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Cut in winter heating guidance

BBC Health: October 21, 2014
Families could reduce energy bills by following new guidance from Public Health England on recommended heating levels.

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Blood biomarker may detect lung cancer

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
A new study shows that patients with stage I to stage III non-small cell lung cancer have different metabolite profiles in their blood than those of patients who are at risk but do not have lung cancer.

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CPAP use for sleep apnea does not negatively impact sexual quality of life

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
Patients who use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device to treat obstructive sleep apnea often believe that it makes them less sexually attractive, according to researchers. New research shows they need not worry.

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Dramatic decline in mortality rates for acute respiratory distress syndrome

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
The largest study to date of mortality trends in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome shows that the rate of mortality dropped significantly over a 16-year period. Advances in critical care medicine are seen as a direct cause of the decline.

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Immune proteins moonlight to regulate brain-cell connections

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
When it comes to the brain, 'more is better' seems like an obvious assumption. But in the case of synapses, which are the connections between brain cells, too many or too few can both disrupt brain function. Researchers recently found an immune-system protein that moonlights in the nervous system to help regulate the number of synapses, and could play an unexpected role in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes and autism.

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Detecting cancer earlier is goal of new medical imaging technology

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
A new medical imaging method could help physicians detect cancer and other diseases earlier than before, speeding treatment and reducing the need for invasive, time-consuming biopsies. The potentially lifesaving technique uses nanotechnology and shortwave infrared light to reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions deep inside the body.

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New analysis methodology may revolutionize breast cancer therapy

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
Stroma cells are derived from connective tissue and may critically influence tumor growth. This knowledge is not new. However, a team of researchers has developed a novel methodology for investigation. Using modern mass spectrometry, tumor-promoting activities from breast fibroblasts were directly determined from needle biopsy samples.

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Backpack physics: Smaller hikers carry heavier loads

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
Hikers are generally advised that the weight of the packs they carry should correspond to their own size, with smaller individuals carrying lighter loads. Although petite backpackers might appreciate the excuse to hand off heavier gear to the larger members of the group, it turns out that they may not need the help.

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Exploring x-ray phase tomography with synchrotron radiation

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
X-ray phase tomography is an imaging technique that uses penetrating X-rays to create volumetric views through "slices" or sections of soft biological tissues, such as tumors, and it offers strongly enhanced contrast compared to conventional CT scans. Yet scientists still do not know which X-ray phase tomography methods are best suited to yield optimized results for a wide variety of conditions.

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Not just skin cancer: Triplet threat from the sun

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
The most obvious effects of too much sun exposure are cosmetic, like wrinkled and rough skin. Some damage, however, goes deeper—ultraviolet light can damage DNA and cause proteins in the body to break down into smaller, sometimes harmful pieces that may also damage DNA, increasing the risk of skin cancer and cataracts. Understanding the specific pathways by which this degradation occurs is an important step in developing protective mechanisms against it.

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NHS drafts in extra A&E doctors

BBC Health: October 21, 2014
The NHS is recruiting about 260 extra doctors in an effort to ease pressure on accident and emergency units in England, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt says.

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Wearable tech must get smart with data

Healthcare IT News: October 21, 2014
For wearable technology to live up to the hype, especially when it comes to healthcare, it will have to be "interoperable, integrated, engaging, social and outcomes-driven," according to PwC. One in five American adults already own a wearable device, according to PwC's new series, "The Wearable Future," a rapid adoption rate that's only expected to increase. read more

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Wikipedia and Facebook for clinical documentation

Healthcare IT News: October 21, 2014
Over the past several years I've written about the inadequate state of clinical documentation, which is largely unchanged since the days of Osler, (except for a bit more structure introduced by Larry Weed in the 1970s) and was created for billing/legal purposes not for care coordination.   read more

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New Delhi Braces for Worst Air Quality

Scientific American: Health: October 21, 2014
Air quality in New Delhi will deteriorate to "severe" levels this week when Indians set off firecrackers to celebrate the Hindu festival of lights, a government scientist said, leaving many... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Misreporting diet information could impact nutrition recommendations for Hispanics

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
Faulty self-reporting of the food we eat can lead to incorrect conclusions about whether we are meeting dietary recommendations for certain essential nutrients, say researchers. A new study is the first to examine how accounting for the problem of misreporting affects nutrient intake estimates in the Hispanic community. Nearly one in three US residents is projected to be Hispanic in 2060.

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Hungry or not, kids will eat treats

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
Even though they are not hungry, children as young as three will find high-energy treats too tempting to refuse, new research has confirmed. In a study of three and four year olds, 100 per cent of children opted for a sweet or savory snack despite eating a filling healthy lunch only 15 minutes prior.

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Child's poor decision-making skills can predict later behavior problems, research shows

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
Children who show poor decision-making skills at age 10 or 11 may be more likely to experience interpersonal and behavioral difficulties that have the potential to lead to high-risk health behavior in their teen years, according to a new study.

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Traffic Pollution May Be a Risk While Pregnant

WebMD: October 21, 2014
Reduced lung function seen in children at age 4, study says

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How Texas campus police tackle stalking

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
One out of every five female students experience stalking victimization during their college career, but many of those cases are not reported to police, according to a new study.

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New viral mutation made middle-aged adults more susceptible to last year's flu

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
A possible explanation for why middle-aged adults were hit especially hard by the H1N1 influenza virus during the 2013-2014 influenza season has been uncovered by scientists. Their findings offer evidence that a new mutation in H1N1 viruses potentially led to more disease in these individuals.

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Living With a Smoker Like Living in a Polluted City: Study

WebMD: October 21, 2014
Air-particle levels in smoking households almost 10 times higher than nonsmoking homes

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Coordination between gut bacteria, biological clocks may be crucial for preventing obesity, glucose intolerance

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
Proper coordination between our gut bacteria and our biological clocks may be crucial for preventing obesity and glucose intolerance, scientists say. "Our gut bacteria's ability to coordinate their functions with our biological clock demonstrates, once again, the ties that bind us to our bacterial population and the fact that disturbances in these ties can have consequences for our health," a researcher notes.

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Sleep duration affects risk for ulcerative colitis

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
If you are not getting the recommended seven to eight hours of sleep each night, you may be at increased risk of developing ulcerative colitis, according to a new study.

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Analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs may have impact on depression

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
Ordinary over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs purchased from pharmacies may also be effective in the treatment of people suffering of depression, as demonstrated by the largest ever meta-analysis based on 14 international studies with a total 6,262 patients who either suffered from depression or had individual symptoms of depression.

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Peanut in house dust linked to peanut allergy in children with skin gene mutation

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 21, 2014
A strong link between exposure to peanut protein in household dust during infancy and the development of peanut allergy in children genetically predisposed to a skin barrier defect has been discovered by researchers.

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