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New Fitbit

Have you seen the NEW Fitbits?

Fitbit has come a long way and continues to be the top fitness tracker. And now, it is seen as an eye catching fashion accessory and a fitness bling statement. Fitbit's newest models are now at the intersection of advanced health tracking and high end fashion. Fitbit has accomplished the combination of beautiful design and personal health information. Check out the new wrist candy and all the cool features it has to offer here >> See the HOTTEST new Fitbits!

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Matcha Green Tea Super Food Antioxidants

Awaken Your Sleeping Beauty With This Sleep Tracker

Sleep is the new hot topic and from what science tells us, it is the holy grail of health. If you can track it, you can optimize it. If you can optimize it, you can benefit from it. This hot new sleep tracker by Hello is the perfect sleep tracker for the perfect price. There is beauty in health, and it needs to be awakened. But before that, let's get the best sleep of our lives. If your VR headset lenses have stopped fogging up, you can learn more here: Sense Sleep Tracker on Amazon

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Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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Medical News Headlines

AP Explains: Can chronic meth use lead to psychosis?

Associated Press Healthwire: April 29, 2017
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Over the past seven years, Los Angeles jail officials have seen a nearly 50 percent increase in the number of mentally ill inmates, a rise the sheriff attributes to methamphetamine use....

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LA jail adapts amid meth-fueled rise in mentally ill inmates

Associated Press Healthwire: April 29, 2017
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Perhaps the largest group of mentally ill inmates in the U.S. resides in Los Angeles in one of the world's largest jail complexes....

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LA jail adapts amid meth-fueled rise in mentally ill inmates

Associated Press Healthwire: April 29, 2017
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Perhaps the largest group of mentally ill inmates in the U.S. resides in Los Angeles, in one of the world's largest jail complexes....

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Are yearly body exams an answer to rising skin cancer rates?

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 29, 2017
As summer nears and more people prepare to go out in the sun, a dermatologist and dermatopathologist discusses the conflicting recommendations over full body skin inspections.

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In Case You Missed It

Scientific American: Health: April 29, 2017
Top news from around the world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Is Eating Late Bad for Your Heart?

Scientific American: Health: April 29, 2017
The American Heart Association suggests that late night eating might increase your risk of heart disease.  But how solid is the evidence? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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FDA Designates Medtronic Worldwide Voluntary Field Action on HVAD(TM) System Controllers and DC Adapters as Class I Recall

FDA Recalls: April 28, 2017
Medtronic plc (NYSE: MDT) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified the company's recently initiated voluntary field action related to its HVAD(TM) System Controllers (serial numbers lower than CON300000) and DC Adapters (all serial numbers for product code 1435) as a Class I recall.

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Is active surveillance safe for men with family history of prostate cancer?

Reuters Health News: April 28, 2017
(Reuters Health) - Having a family history of prostate cancer doesn’t make it more risky for men with a new diagnosis of the disease to initially hold off on active treatment in favor of monitoring with periodic lab tests, a research review suggests.

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Mapping the edge of reality

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 28, 2017
A genetic algorithm has been determined to confirm the rejection of classical notions of causality.

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Rising costs, potential savings for generic, topical steroids

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 28, 2017
Although most topical steroids prescribed to patients were generic in a new American study, there was a sharp increase in Medicare Part D and out-of-pocket spending for elderly patients taking these drugs.

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US yellow fever vaccine supply will run out this summer

CNN Health: April 28, 2017
American supplies of yellow fever vaccine are expected to run out this summer , the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday, and it released a report outlining a plan to ensure continuous access.

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With Obamacare in doubt, California asks insurers to double up on rate filings

Reuters Health News: April 28, 2017
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Health insurers seeking regulatory approval for 2018 individual insurance plans can file two sets of premium rates as a way to deal with market uncertainty created by Republicans' promise to repeal and replace Obamacare, a California state insurance regulator said on Friday.

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Fears of losing pre-existing conditions protection under GOP

Associated Press Healthwire: April 28, 2017
WASHINGTON (AP) -- From cancer to addiction, doctors and patient groups are warning that the latest Republican health care bill would gut hard-won protections for people with pre-existing medical conditions. Some GOP moderates who may seal the legislation's fate are echoing those concerns....

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Readers pan all aspects of Trump's first 100 days dealing with healthcare

Healthcare IT News: April 28, 2017
Healthcare IT News readers largely booed Trump's choice of appointees, communication by HHS and his attempt at replacing Obamacare.

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Unravelling the mystery of DNA attacks in cells' powerhouse could pave way for new cancer treatments

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 28, 2017
A five-year study has found the mechanism responsible for repairing damage to mitochondrial DNA. This discovery could pave the way for new treatments for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, say the researchers. This research may also have important implications for clinical advances in so called ‘three-parent baby’ mitochondrial donation.

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Achieving Health Equity: Tools for a National Campaign Against Racism

American Academy of Family Physicians: April 28, 2017
During her keynote speech at the National Conference of Constituency Leaders, Camara Jones, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., discussed achieving health equity while combating racism.

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Rethink emphasis on lowering saturated fat to save hearts: docs

Reuters Health News: April 28, 2017
(Reuters Health) - Instead of eating less saturated fat and worrying about so-called bad cholesterol, a group of doctors suggests an alternative approach for preventing heart disease.

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Not so fast, vendors, fixing VistA is not off the table

Healthcare IT News: April 28, 2017
While the healthcare industry debates the future of the outdated EHR, VA’s acting undersecretary said the agency is still looking into all options.

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Doctors should consider whether older patients can hear them

Reuters Health News: April 28, 2017
(Reuters Health) - Elderly people with hearing loss may have difficulty understanding speech in noisy healthcare settings - and the situation isn't helped when doctors speak fast and use medical jargon, experts say.

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Some practices still don't run analytics on EHR data

Healthcare IT News: April 28, 2017
MGMA survey finds mixed approach to interpreting, aggregating or organizing their records.

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Counting the cuts in Mohs surgery: A way to improve care and reduce costs

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 28, 2017
In an analysis of Medicare billing data submitted by more than 2,300 United States physicians, researchers have calculated the average number of surgical slices, or cuts, made during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS), a procedure that progressively removes thin layers of cancerous skin tissue in a way that minimizes damage to healthy skin and the risks of leaving cancerous tissue behind.

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Modern metabolic science yields better way to calculate indoor carbon dioxide

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 28, 2017
The air we breathe out can help us improve the quality of the air we breathe in. But to do so, one needs a reliable way to calculate the concentration of carbon dioxide we produce indoors. Researchers have developed a new computation method that uses well-established concepts from the study of human metabolism and exercise physiology to significantly improve how this important data is derived.

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Medication errors: Hospitals slow to meet barcode standard, big on CPOE

Healthcare IT News: April 28, 2017
Leapfrog Group says 30 percent of hospitals fully meet the four criteria for bar code medication administration, though 74 percent meet the group’s two CPOE criteria.

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Trump names anti-abortion leader to high post at HHS

Associated Press Healthwire: April 28, 2017
NEW YORK (AP) -- The White House says President Donald Trump is appointing the former president of a leading anti-abortion organization to a senior position at the Department of Health and Human Services....

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Portraits of Malaria

Scientific American: Health: April 28, 2017
Images from Alor island, Indonesia; Pailin, Cambodia and Mae sot, Thailand -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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DIY gun control: The people taking matters into their own hands

New Scientist Health News: April 28, 2017
With the Trump administration stripping away firearms legislation, can citizen scientists and technologists rein in the excesses of US gun culture?

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Lincoln Center to Host Theater Festival for Autistic Audience

New York Times - Health: April 28, 2017
The Big Umbrella Festival, arriving in April 2018, hopes to make theater a safe space for children on the autism spectrum.

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Helpful tool allows physicians to more accurately predict parathyroid cancer recurrence

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 28, 2017
A newly-created prognostic tool reliably predicts the recurrence of parathyroid cancer, enabling physicians to identify patients at the highest risk. Consequently, the tool also helps to determine the optimum postoperative strategy, including aggressive surveillance and additional treatments, according to study results.

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Zika virus persists in the central nervous system and lymph nodes of rhesus monkeys

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 28, 2017
Zika virus can persist in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), lymph nodes and colorectal tissue of infected rhesus monkeys for weeks after the virus has been cleared from blood, urine and mucosal secretions, according to a study.

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DoD work is ‘making Cerner better,’ as company posts 11% revenue jump

Healthcare IT News: April 28, 2017
President Zane Burke said at this point there’s nothing but speculation about a potential contract to replace the VA’s VistA.

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Breast surgeon Ian Paterson case: 'Hundreds' of other victims

BBC Health: April 28, 2017
Surgeon Ian Paterson was convicted of intentionally wounding patients with unnecessary operations.

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US facing shortage of yellow fever vaccine for travelers

Associated Press Healthwire: April 28, 2017
NEW YORK (AP) -- Americans who need a yellow fever shot for travel may soon have a harder getting it....

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First endoscopic stricturotomy with needle knife study for intestinal strictures in IBD

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 28, 2017
The first study illustrating the safety and efficacy of endoscopic needle-knife therapy for intestinal strictures in patients with inflammatory bowel disorder has been released by physicians. The results appear to be promising.

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Malaria, wiped out in U.S., still plagues American travelers

Reuters Health News: April 28, 2017
(Reuters Health) - U.S. public health officials declared victory over malaria in 1951, but the mosquito-borne disease continues to infect and kill American travelers, a new study shows.

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The gym class where nodding off is the new working out

BBC Health: April 28, 2017
The health clubs offering exhausted parents the chance to sleep for 45 minutes.

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Desk traffic lights show when you’re too busy for interruptions

New Scientist Health News: April 28, 2017
The FlowLight system tracks how busy workers are on their computers ­– and warns off colleagues if you are not to be disturbed

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