Medical Search

Featured Medical Stories

Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

Learn more at Fitbit's Official Website HOT! Browse Fitbit Products Google for Fitbit
The Art of Lip Injections

The Secret Art of Natural Lip Injections

Is there a secret art to lip enhancement? You surely know when you've seen someone and immediately reacted, "she had her lips done!". What about the lips that have been filled, look terrific, and you don't know they've been enhanced with filler? That's the secret art to lip fillers and that is why it is critical to select a physician injector who knows the secrets. What are the secrets to getting great lip enhancements? First, experience! Second, the artist within! The injector must also understand the complex, and sometimes unforgiving, anatomy of the lips. These artistic and technical demands explain why so many patients receive sub-standard lip injections and are left with unnatural results. Patients often believe that lip enhancement always leads to unnatural, over-filled results; in actuality, this should never occur in experienced hands.

Read The Art of Lip Fillers Find Lip Filler Doctor Near You Google Lip Fillers
PSA Screenings Decline

PSA Screenings Decline Following New Recommendations

The Journal of Urology reports that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing has declined in the United States following a 2013 recommendation by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)—a group of primary care physicians charged with developing recommendations about which preventative health screenings should be covered under the Affordable Health Care Act.

Read at USMD Prostate Cancer Center More News From Medical Web Times Google PSA Screenings Decline

Medical News Headlines

Follow that Cell

National Institutes of Health: August 22, 2014
NIH challenges innovators with a half million dollars in prizes.

Read at National Institutes of Health More News From National Institutes of Health Google This Topic

Difficulty assessing effort drives motivation deficits in schizophrenia, study finds

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
Individuals with schizophrenia often have trouble engaging in daily tasks or setting goals for themselves, and a new study suggests the reason might be their difficulty in assessing the amount of effort required to complete tasks. The research can assist health professionals in countering motivation deficits among patients with schizophrenia and help those patients function normally by breaking up larger, complex tasks into smaller, easier-to-grasp ones.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

How cellular guardians of the intestine develop

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
New research sheds light on the development of a unique class of immune cells known as intraepithelial lymphocytes found in the thin layer of tissue lining the intestine. This work may help lead to new insights into inflammatory diseases of the gut, including Inflammatory Bowel Disorder and celiac disease, as well as cancer.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Some anti-inflammatory drugs affect more than their targets

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
Three commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs alter the activity of enzymes within cell membranes, researchers have found. Their finding suggests that, if taken at higher-than-approved doses and/or for long periods of time, these prescription-level nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and other drugs that affect the membrane may produce wide-ranging and unwanted side effects.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Potential risk factors for urinary tract infections in young girls

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
Young girls with an intense, red, itchy rash on their outer genital organs may be at increased risk of developing urinary tract infections (UTIs). The treatment may be as simple as better hygiene and avoiding potential irritants such as bubble baths and swimming pools.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain: May be possible to prune synapses with drug after diagnosis

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain “pruning” process during development, according to a new study. Because synapses are the points where neurons connect and communicate with each other, the excessive synapses may have profound effects on how the brain functions.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Two U.S. Ebola Patients Are Released by Atlanta Hospital

New York Times - Health: August 21, 2014
The release of the first patients ever to be treated for the Ebola virus at a hospital in the United States caps an international medical drama.

Read at New York Times - Health More News From New York Times - Health Google This Topic

D.E.A. Increases Restrictions on Prescription Painkillers Like Vicodin

New York Times - Health: August 21, 2014
To tackle prescription drug abuse, new rules for dispensing hydrocodone, the most widely prescribed painkiller in the United States, include no phoned-in prescriptions and no refills.

Read at New York Times - Health More News From New York Times - Health Google This Topic

The New Old Age Blog: Part D Gains May Be Eroding

New York Times - Health: August 21, 2014
More Medicare beneficiaries are not taking prescribed medications or forgoing basic needs to pay for them, a new study finds.

Read at New York Times - Health More News From New York Times - Health Google This Topic

Well: Food and the Dying Patient

New York Times - Health: August 21, 2014
The medicalization of food deprives the dying of some of the last remnants of the human experience: taste, smell, touch and connection to loved ones.

Read at New York Times - Health More News From New York Times - Health Google This Topic

5 Fun Facts About Parsnips

WebMD: August 21, 2014
Sweet in taste and full of vitamins, the humble parsnip is a boon in winter dishes -– including WebMD's delicious parsnip and potato gratin.

Read at WebMD More News From WebMD Google This Topic

Well: Is Breakfast Overrated?

New York Times - Health: August 21, 2014
Researchers are questioning the assumptions behind morning meals.

Read at New York Times - Health More News From New York Times - Health Google This Topic

Polio: Mutated virus breaches vaccine protection

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
Thanks to effective vaccination, polio is considered nearly eradicated. Each year only a few hundred people are stricken worldwide. However, scientists are reporting alarming findings: a mutated virus that was able to resist the vaccine protection to a considerable extent was found in victims of an outbreak in the Congo in 2010. The pathogen could also potentially have infected many people in Germany.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

US Ebola patients out of hospital

BBC Health: August 21, 2014
The two US aid workers infected with the Ebola virus in Liberia have recovered and have been discharged from hospital, medical officials say.

Read at BBC Health More News From BBC Health Google This Topic

Crazy good

Healthcare IT News: August 21, 2014
Crazy good Daily Feature 1 of 11 The Crazy Ones"Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently." With a nod to Apple and its famous 1997 TV spot, which highlighted doers and dreamers in all fields of endeavor – those who colored outside the lines, we put the spotlight on just a few of the many "crazy ones" who are helping transform health IT in new and unique ways. See also: [ 5 'crazy ones' reshaping health IT.] Inspired by the iconic commercial Apple launched in 1997, we introduce just a few of

Read at Healthcare IT News More News From Healthcare IT News Google This Topic

New restrictions on hydrocodone to take effect

Associated Press Healthwire: August 21, 2014
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The federal government is finalizing new restrictions on hundreds of medicines containing hydrocodone, the highly addictive painkiller that has grown into the most widely prescribed drug in the U.S....

Read at Associated Press Healthwire More News From Associated Press Healthwire Google This Topic

Microsoft taps into mHealth

Healthcare IT News: August 21, 2014
With nearly 26 million Americans living with diabetes -- and racking up $245 billion in costs each year -- many stakeholders have been looking for innovative ways to help those individuals better keep tabs on their condition. With its new mobile health project, Microsoft is the latest company to offer a diabetes management platform.   read more

Read at Healthcare IT News More News From Healthcare IT News Google This Topic

Cellular biology of colorectal cancer: New Insight

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
A new role for the protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in suppressing colorectal cancer -- the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. -- has been outlined by new research, providing a better understanding of the illness. "It's not widely appreciated, but there is still plenty of cell growth going on in adults, with the colon being a good example," a researcher said. "On average, we shed and replace about 70 pounds of intestinal tissue annually, so you can imagine that this process requires exquisite control to prevent tumor formation."

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Feeling bad at work can be a good thing (and vice versa)

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
Contrary to popular opinion, it can be good to feel bad at work, whilst feeling good in the workplace can also lead to negative outcomes, researchers say. The commonly-held assumption that positivity in the workplace produces positive outcomes, while negative emotions lead to negative outcomes, may be in need for reconsideration.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Insulin offers new hope for treatment of acute pancreatitis

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
Insulin can protect the cells of the pancreas from acute pancreatitis -- a disease for which there is currently no treatment -- researchers report. Acute pancreatitis involves the pancreas digesting itself resulting in severe abdominal pain, vomiting and systemic inflammation.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Experimental Ebola drugs must be fairly distributed, tested ethically in clinical trials

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
Critical ethical principles need to be adhered to if experimental drugs are to be deployed in the Ebola outbreak, bioethicists say, stating that the patients selected to receive such drugs must not be limited to well-off or well-connected patients -- including health care professionals. These experts also point out that, given the limited supply of experimental drugs and their low probability of success, containment of the epidemic and strengthening health systems in affected regions should be a priority.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Consumer Reports Advises Pregnant Women to Avoid Tuna

WebMD: August 21, 2014
Guideline is prompted by concerns about mercury exposure

Read at WebMD More News From WebMD Google This Topic

Health Highlights: Aug. 21, 2014

WebMD: August 21, 2014
MLB Pitcher Curt Schilling Blames Mouth Cancer on Chewing Tobacco

Read at WebMD More News From WebMD Google This Topic

Clinical Spotlight Episode 16: Raymond A. Gensinger, Jr., MD

Healthcare IT News: August 21, 2014
Raymond A. Gensinger, Jr., MD, CPHIMS, FHIMSS, discusses his new book Analytics in Healthcare: An Introduction (HIMSS Books, 2014) at HIMSS14. Thumbnail:  read more

Read at Healthcare IT News More News From Healthcare IT News Google This Topic

Exercise and Your Heart

NIH Medline Plus: August 21, 2014
Source: HealthDay - Related MedlinePlus Pages: Atrial Fibrillation, Exercise and Physical Fitness, Heart Diseases--Prevention, Women's Health

Read at NIH Medline Plus More News From NIH Medline Plus Google This Topic

3-D printers used to create custom medical implants that deliver drugs, chemo

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
An innovative method for using affordable, consumer-grade 3D printers and materials has been developed to fabricate custom medical implants that can contain antibacterial and chemotherapeutic compounds for targeted drug delivery. "It is truly novel and a worldwide first to be 3D printing custom devices with antibiotics and chemotherapeutics," said one researcher.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us -- they are more extroverted, agreeable and open -- attributes that make them successful in the demanding, fast-paced and often stressful environment of an emergency department, according to a new study.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

New feeding tube connectors will improve patient safety

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
New feeding tube connectors, designed by an international standards process, will be available soon and will improve patient safety. Small-bore connectors, which are used to join medical devices, components, and accessories to deliver fluids or gases, can allow misconnections with other medical devices. Serious patient harm, including death, can occur if fluids, medications, or nutrition formulas intended for the gastrointestinal tract are administered via the wrong route.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Counseling has limited benefit on young people drinking alcohol, study suggests

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
Counseling techniques used to help young people with drinking problems may be of limited benefit, a new study suggests. Researchers found that an approach known as motivational interviewing did not substantially reduce drinking or alter alcohol-related behavior.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Experts question value of common superbug control practices

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
The jury is still out on the effectiveness of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) superbug control policies in hospitals, according to leading infectious disease experts. In particular, screening and isolating infected patients -- which have long been regarded as the gold standard MRSA prevention strategy and are required by law in some countries -- have poor evidence for their effectiveness, say the authors.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Models to study polyelectrolytes developed, including DNA and RNA

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
A novel and versatile modeling strategy has been developed to simulate polyelectrolyte systems. The model has applications for creating new materials as well as for studying polyelectrolytes, including DNA and RNA. Polyelectrolytes are chains of molecules that are positively or negatively charged when placed in water. Because they are sensitive to changes in their environment, polyelectrolytes hold promise for use in applications such as drug delivery mechanisms.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Big Apple doctor-in-chief seeks community approach

Associated Press Healthwire: August 21, 2014
NEW YORK (AP) -- New York City's new health boss doesn't want to be your nanny. Think of her more as a tutor....

Read at Associated Press Healthwire More News From Associated Press Healthwire Google This Topic

Ibuprofen posing potential threat to fish, researchers say

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
Many rivers contain levels of ibuprofen that could be adversely affecting fish health, researchers report. In what is believed to be the first study to establish the level of risk posed by ibuprofen at the country scale, the researchers examined 3,112 stretches of river which together receive inputs from 21 million people.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Important clue found for potential treatments for absence seizures

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
A group of researchers has succeeded in revealing a principle mechanism of a neural network in the human brain, which will provide an important clue to potential treatments for absence seizures. Absence seizures are believed to be elicited by T-type calcium channels in the thalamic reticular nucleus of the brain that regulate influxes of calcium. These channels enable thalamic reticular nucleus neurons to generate burst firing, leading the neurons to enter a hyper-excited state.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic

Novel pathway for prevention of heart attack, stroke

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 21, 2014
A recent study could pave the way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis. Finnish researchers have found that the low-expression variant of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is particularly common among Finns, reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke. The finding revealed a promising new way to customize a potentially preventive drug for atherosclerosis.

Read at ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine More News From ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine Google This Topic