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Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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The Art of Lip Injections

The Secret Art of Natural Lip Injections

Is there a secret art to lip enhancement? You surely know when you've seen someone and immediately reacted, "she had her lips done!". What about the lips that have been filled, look terrific, and you don't know they've been enhanced with filler? That's the secret art to lip fillers and that is why it is critical to select a physician injector who knows the secrets. What are the secrets to getting great lip enhancements? First, experience! Second, the artist within! The injector must also understand the complex, and sometimes unforgiving, anatomy of the lips. These artistic and technical demands explain why so many patients receive sub-standard lip injections and are left with unnatural results. Patients often believe that lip enhancement always leads to unnatural, over-filled results; in actuality, this should never occur in experienced hands.

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PSA Screenings Decline

PSA Screenings Decline Following New Recommendations

The Journal of Urology reports that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing has declined in the United States following a 2013 recommendation by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)—a group of primary care physicians charged with developing recommendations about which preventative health screenings should be covered under the Affordable Health Care Act.

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Medical News Headlines

S Leone hunts seized Ebola patient

BBC Health: July 25, 2014
A hunt is launched in Sierra Leone's capital, Freetown, for a woman with Ebola who was forcibly removed from hospital by her relatives.

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Technology lets ALS sufferers speak

CNN Health: July 25, 2014
Many ALS sufferers fear losing their ability to speak, but a new technology may allow them to keep their voice.

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Sexism 'puts women off sports'

BBC Health: July 25, 2014
A report by MPs suggests a lack of female participation in sport has long-term health and social consequences.

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Healthy skin on a budget

CNN Health: July 25, 2014
CNN's Holly Firfer tells us how we can have healthy, youthful skin on a budget.

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FAQ: Training for your first tri

CNN Health: July 25, 2014
Tackling your first triathlon? Even the best triathletes in the world started somewhere -- and made their share of rookie mistakes.

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Training for your first triathlon? 4 common Qs

CNN Health: July 25, 2014
Tackling your first triathlon? Even the best triathletes in the world started somewhere -- and made their share of rookie mistakes.

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AUDIO: Shift work 'increases diabetes risk'

BBC Health: July 25, 2014
IOSH's Jane White and London Business School's Lynda Gratton discuss new research suggesting Type 2 diabetes is more common in people who work shifts.

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Bedtime light 'may stop cancer drug'

BBC Health: July 25, 2014
Even dimly lit bedrooms may stop breast cancer drugs from working, according to US research.

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Chicken factory health probe ordered

BBC Health: July 25, 2014
An investigation into allegations of hygiene failings at poultry processing factories is ordered by Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt.

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Joblessness could kill you, but recessions could be good for your health

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
While previous studies of individuals have shown that employees who lose their jobs have a higher mortality rate, more comprehensive studies have shown, unexpectedly, that population mortality actually declines as unemployment rates increase. Researchers set out to better understand these seemingly contradictory findings.

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Cancer: Treatment that prevents tumor metastasis identified in animal study

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Metastasis, the strategy adopted by tumor cells to transform into an aggressive form of cancer, are often associated with a gloomy prognosis. Managing to block the metastasis or, even better, prevent their formation would be a giant step towards the fight against cancer. Researchers successfully performed this on models of human tumors in mice.

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Well: Seeing the Child, Not the Disability

New York Times - Health: July 24, 2014
“People in health care, they don’t stare at my son like he’s some kind of freak, you know? They see him for who he is,” a patient’s mother said at a recent appointment.

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High school students in some schools smoking at same rate as adults

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Cuyahoga County high school students are smoking tobacco products at the same rate as adults in the county, according to new data. In 2013, more than 22 percent, or one in five high school students, report use of any tobacco product within the prior 30 days.

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Study: Car Interiors Reach Dangerous Temps All Year

WebMD: July 24, 2014
After a string of high-profile cases of kids being left in hot cars this year, a new study shows just how quickly heat can become a danger, even in cooler months of the year.

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Government 'loses £700m NHS IT case'

BBC Health: July 24, 2014
Taxpayers could be hit with a £700m bill after the government reportedly loses a legal fight with Fujitsu.

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Well: Living With Cancer: A Tour of Hospice

New York Times - Health: July 24, 2014
I welcomed the idea of touring a new hospice facility to confront my fears of pain while dying, writes Susan Gubar in her continuing “Living With Cancer” series.

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Phil Alexander - Privacy & Security Forum 2014 San Diego

Healthcare IT News: July 24, 2014
Phil Alexander, Information Security Officer at UMC and session panelist at the 2014 Privacy & Security Forum in San Diego, discusses the rise of cyber crime and the importance of personalizing employee education around security. Thumbnail:  read more

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Teens pay high psychiatric toll when raised in conditions of political conflict

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Israeli youths exposed to protracted conflict suffer far higher levels of anxiety, phobia, fear, depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and paranoia than their counterparts in the US. The largest cross-sectional empirical study of its kind, the research assessed youths exposed to terrorism, missile attacks, war, forced residential relocations, and military operations.

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Metastatic brain tumor treatment could be on the horizon with use of SapC-DOPS

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
A new study has provided hope that previously studied SapC-DOPS could be used for treatment of brain cancer that has spread. "These results support the potential of SapC-DOPS for the diagnosis and therapy of primary and metastatic brain tumors which is critically needed to increase survival rates of patients with this illness,” one researcher said.

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Annual financial cost of COPD $36 billion in U.S.: CDC report

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
A new report outlines the total and state-specific medical and absenteeism costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among adults in the United States, and lays out some projections to 2020. Chronic lower respiratory diseases, including COPD, are the third-leading cause of death in the United States. Close to 24 million US adults have evidence of impaired lung function, indicating an underdiagnosis of COPD. Smoking is a primary risk factor of COPD, and approximately 80% of COPD deaths can be attributed to smoking.

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Seeing same GP at every visit will reduce emergency department attendance

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Attendances at emergency departments can be reduced by enabling patients to see the same GP every time they visit their doctor's surgery. This is just one of several recommendations made in a report published. Other factors that also affect admission and attendances at emergency departments are: how easy it is for patients to access GP surgeries and primary care providers; the distance the patients live away from the emergency department; and the number of confusing options patients had for accessing emergency care.

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Study: Obamacare gave 10 million health insurance

CNN Health: July 24, 2014
About 10.3 million Americans gained health coverage this year, primarily as a result of the Affordable Care Act, according to a study by the federal government and Harvard University.

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Mechanism that clears excess of protein linked with Type 2 diabetes

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
In people who do not have Type 2 diabetes, autophagy prevents the accumulation of toxic forms of IAPP, researchers have found. In people with Type 2 diabetes, the process appears to not work properly, contributing to the destruction of beta cells. As the body's insulin producers, beta cells play a key role in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels.

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Natural products from plants protect skin during cancer radiotherapy

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Plant-derived natural product chemicals could offer protection to the skin from the harmful effects of gamma radiation during cancer radiotherapy, suggests research.

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Background TV can be bad for kids

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Leaving the television on can be detrimental to children's learning and development, according to a new study. Researchers found that background television can divert a child’s attention from play and learning. Regardless of family demographics, parenting can act as a buffer against the impacts of background TV, the research team found.

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Standards key to mHealth success

Healthcare IT News: July 24, 2014
No matter where you go, it seems, someone's talking up mHealth.  But according to two two officials with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association, a healthy wariness is in order.  read more

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Hospital hit with $150K breach fine

Healthcare IT News: July 24, 2014
A Rhode Island hospital, who nearly two years ago notified 14,000 patients of a HIPAA breach involving their data, agreed Wednesday to hand over $150,000 to settle allegations that it failed to safeguard patient information.    The Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, or WIH, will pay the civil penalty to the Massachusetts Attorney General who slapped the hospital with a lawsuit after discovering 12,127 of those patients were Massachusetts residents.    read more

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CHIME sees vet IT program as model

Healthcare IT News: July 24, 2014
The College of Healthcare Information Management Executives, with more than 1,400 CIO and IT team members, has released a case study that delves into the workings of a Rush University Medical Center initiative that gives veterans opportunities to become part of a healthcare IT workforce. read more

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Parents of Obese Kids Often View Them as Healthy

WebMD: July 24, 2014
They're more likely to change their children's diet than encourage exercise, study finds

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Teenage Boys and Sex

NIH Medline Plus: July 24, 2014
Source: HealthDay - Related MedlinePlus Page: Teen Sexual Health

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Voice for radio? New research reveals it's in the cords

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Unique vocal cord vibration patterns might be the secret behind a good radio voice, new research reveals. The world-first study filmed the vocal folds of 16 male radio performers, including announcers, broadcasters, newsreaders and voice-over artists and found their vocal folds move and close faster than non-broadcasters.

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Experiments prove 'stemness' of individual immune memory cells

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Specific individual immune cells, termed 'central memory T cells,' have all the essential characteristics of adult tissue stem cells, researchers have proven for the first time. Such cells can perpetuate themselves indefinitely and generate diverse offspring that can reconstitute "tissue" function. These findings indicate that it should be possible to fully restore specific immunity to pathogens in immunocompromised patients by substitution of small numbers of these T cells.

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Newly discovered gut virus lives in half the world's population

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Odds are, there's a virus living inside your gut that has gone undetected by scientists for decades. A new study has found that more than half the world's population is host to a newly described virus, named crAssphage, which infects one of the most common gut bacterial species, Bacteroides. This bacterium thought to be connected with obesity, diabetes and other gut-related diseases.

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Paracetamol no better than placebo for lower back pain

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Paracetamol is no better than placebo at speeding recovery from acute episodes of lower back pain or improving pain levels, function, sleep, or quality of life, according to the first large randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of paracetamol with placebo for low-back pain. The findings question the universal endorsement of paracetamol as the first choice painkiller for low-back pain, say the authors.

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New drugs to combat asthma, similar illnesses

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Science and industry are collaborating to develop future pharmaceuticals for treating chronic inflammatory diseases. The medicines will combat immunological processes that have gone wrong. Statistics indicate that there are 300 million asthma sufferers worldwide, a further 600 million people living with chronic pneumonia and up to 30% of the global population contending with allergic rhinitis (allergic inflammation of the nasal airways).

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Detecting Salmonella in pork meat processing: New methods

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: July 24, 2014
Infections caused by foodborne microorganisms are an increasing public health burden. In a PhD project, new methods of characterizing and dectecting foodborne illness-causing Salmonella in pork meat processing and in bacteria in water, feed and food samples were studied.

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