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Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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The Art of Lip Injections

The Secret Art of Natural Lip Injections

Is there a secret art to lip enhancement? You surely know when you've seen someone and immediately reacted, "she had her lips done!". What about the lips that have been filled, look terrific, and you don't know they've been enhanced with filler? That's the secret art to lip fillers and that is why it is critical to select a physician injector who knows the secrets. What are the secrets to getting great lip enhancements? First, experience! Second, the artist within! The injector must also understand the complex, and sometimes unforgiving, anatomy of the lips. These artistic and technical demands explain why so many patients receive sub-standard lip injections and are left with unnatural results. Patients often believe that lip enhancement always leads to unnatural, over-filled results; in actuality, this should never occur in experienced hands.

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EBOLA Mask

Ebola Protective Masks Are In High Demand

With the outbreak of the Ebola virus, Ebola protective gear like masks are being bought up quickly. Historically when the threat of a pandemic hits the news, the "preparers" of the world stock up. One on the first line of defense is the Ebola mask. Learn more about what types of Ebola masks can protect you here.

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Medical News Headlines

NIH to admit Texas nurse diagnosed with Ebola virus

National Institutes of Health: October 22, 2014
NIH is taking every precaution to ensure the safety of our patients, NIH staff, and the public.

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Donations for Ebola Relief Efforts Are Slow to Take Off

New York Times - Health: October 20, 2014
Relief agencies are finding it difficult to raise money to combat Ebola and are increasingly relying on large gifts from people like Mark Zuckerberg.

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W.H.O. Declares Nigeria Free of Ebola

New York Times - Health: October 20, 2014
The announcement called Nigeria’s effort a “spectacular success story” but warned that the country, Africa’s most populous, cannot relax its defenses.

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Ebola Vaccine Push Ramps Up

Wall Street Journal: October 20, 2014
The world had little interest in Ebola in 1997, when cell biologist Nancy J. Sullivan took up her work. Today, Dr. Sullivan would likely be at the center of any potential answer to the world’s severest Ebola outbreak.

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User-friendly electronic 'Eyecane' enhances navigational abilities for blind

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
White Canes provide low-tech assistance to the visually impaired, but some blind people object to their use because they are cumbersome, fail to detect elevated obstacles, or require long training periods to master. Electronic travel aids (ETAs) have the potential to improve navigation for the blind, but early versions had disadvantages that limited widespread adoption. A new ETA, the "EyeCane," expands the world of its users, allowing them to better estimate distance, navigate their environment, and avoid obstacles, according to a new study

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Selenium effective treatment against breast cancer, study suggests

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
Selenium, when attached to a monoclonal antibody presently used to treat breast cancer, has shown greater success in destroying cancer cells in a patient who has developed resistance to the chemotherapy, research demonstrates. Almost a quarter of a million people were diagnosed with breast cancer this year, while another 3 million are living with the disease.

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Untested drugs bill a step closer

BBC Health: October 20, 2014
A new law that would allow terminally-ill patients in England and Wales to be given untested medicines moves a step closer after receiving government backing.

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AUDIO: Nursing morale at 'heartbreaking' low

BBC Health: October 20, 2014
A nurse claims "heartbreaking" levels of low morale are driving staff out of the profession

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C.D.C. Issues New Guidelines for Ebola Care

New York Times - Health: October 20, 2014
The new protocols are based on procedures followed by the international aid group Doctors Without Borders.

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Well: Hard Lesson in Sleep for Teenagers

New York Times - Health: October 20, 2014
Adolescents who do not receive adequate rest have trouble keeping up in the classroom and are more vulnerable to other health problems. And catching up on sleep on the weekend won’t help.

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Well: Genetic Variant May Shield Latinas From Breast Cancer

New York Times - Health: October 20, 2014
A new study’s findings may explain why Hispanic women have lower rates of breast cancer than other Americans.

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Nurses not happy with hospital EHRs

Healthcare IT News: October 20, 2014
Frustration with electronic health records has never been higher among RNs, with vast majorities complaining of poor workflows, bad communication and scant input on implementation decisions, a new survey shows. [See also: RNs key to EHR improvement, says CIO] read more

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Brain activity provides evidence for internal 'calorie counter'

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
As you think about how a food will taste and whether it's nutritious, an internal calorie counter of sorts is also evaluating each food based on its caloric density, according to findings from a new neuroimaging study.

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The Power of Play

TEDMED - Medical Discussions: October 20, 2014
In her TEDMED 2014 talk, Jill Vialet, CEO of Playworks, an organization that creates imaginative, inclusive school recreation programs, challenges us to release our inner child and remember that play matters to physical and emotional growth. She spoke with us … Continue reading → The post The Power of Play appeared first on TEDMED Blog.

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Biomarkers uPA/PAI-1 in breast cancer: Benefit, harm of test unclear

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
Since studies are lacking, it remains unclear whether certain patients have a benefit if the decision for or against adjuvant chemotherapy is based on the concentration of uPA and PAI-1, a new report states.

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No added benefit proven for umeclidinium/vilanterol in COPD

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
There are hardly any evaluable data for patients with moderate COPD severity and for patients with few exacerbations; for higher severity grades with more exacerbations, evaluable data are lacking completely, studies show.

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Winning the war against Human parainfluenza virus

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
Researchers have moved a step closer to identifying a treatment for the dreaded Human parainfluenza virus. These highly-infectious viruses are the leading cause of upper and lower respiratory tract disease in young children, including Croup, responsible for thousands of hospitalizations in the developed world, and hundreds of thousands of deaths each year in developing countries.

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New antidepressant: Rapid agent restores pleasure-seeking ahead of other antidepressant action

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
A drug being studied as a fast-acting mood-lifter restored pleasure-seeking behavior independent of -- and ahead of -- its other antidepressant effects. Within 40 minutes after a single infusion of ketamine, treatment-resistant depressed bipolar disorder patients experienced a reversal of a key symptom -- loss of interest in pleasurable activities -- which lasted up to 14 days. Brain scans traced the agent's action to boosted activity in areas at the front and deep in the right hemisphere of the brain.

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Design of micro, nanoparticles to improve treatments for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
Techniques are being developed to deliver correctly and effectively certain drugs to treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Both disorders affect the neurones: their structure and function is lost, and this in turn leads to the deterioration in the patient's motor, cognitive, sensory and emotional functions.

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New class of drugs shows promise in treating chronic diarrhea

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
A pilot study testing a new type of drug in patients with chronic diarrhea has shown promising effects on reducing their symptoms. Bile acid diarrhea (BAD) is a common cause of chronic diarrhea that is estimated to affect one in 100 adults in western countries, but is often mistaken for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by doctors. Many patients are not diagnosed correctly and undergo repeated unnecessary tests.

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Cold sores increase risk of dementia

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
Infection with herpes simplex virus increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease, researchers claim. "Our results clearly show that there is a link between infections of herpes simplex virus and the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. This also means that we have new opportunities to develop treatment forms to stop the disease," says one of the researchers behind the study.

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Analytics project slashes sepsis deaths

Healthcare IT News: October 20, 2014
The folks at Penn Medicine know a little something about putting data analytics to work. After identifying three years ago that their sepsis mortality rates were higher than expected, they set out to do something about it by harnessing predictive analytics. And the results? They're impressive.    read more

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Over-Organizing Repair Cells Set the Stage for Fibrosis

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
The excessive activity of repair cells in the early stages of tissue recovery sets the stage for fibrosis by priming the activation of an important growth factor, according to a new study.

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Advances in creating treatment for common childhood blood cancer

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
A new drug in development may offer first alternative to standard chemotherapy for T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, scientists report. An estimated quarter of the 500 U.S. adolescents and young adults diagnosed each year with this aggressive disease fail to respond to standard chemotherapy drugs that target cancer cells.

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EHRs: The new lightning rod in healthcare

Healthcare IT News: October 20, 2014
When Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital failed to diagnose the first known case of Ebola in the U.S., the hospital initially blamed its electronic health record (EHR). As it turned out, the problem was the humanware, not the software. The culprit was a mundane and all-too-common failure by people to communicate in a fast-paced and stressful medical setting. read more

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Dozens in Dallas Said to Be Free of Ebola Risk

WebMD: October 20, 2014
While U.S. prepares tighter infection controls for Ebola patients

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Ebola or Not? Rapid Test for the Virus Not Here Yet

WebMD: October 20, 2014
With flu season approaching, finding an accurate, speedy screening method will become more important

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Mobile docs get most from their EHRs

Healthcare IT News: October 20, 2014
One of the takeaways of a recent survey conducted by Software Advice indicates that mHealth users are better at using electronic health records – and getting more out of them – than doctors who use PCs. It may say as much about the type of person who uses mobile devices as it does about the state of EHR adoption in the U.S. read more

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NBC's Snyderman faces credibility issues

Associated Press Healthwire: October 20, 2014
NEW YORK (AP) -- The quarantine against possible Ebola exposure ends this week for Dr. Nancy Snyderman, but the troubles clearly aren't over for NBC News' chief medical editor....

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The New Health Care: On an Antibiotic? You May Be Getting Only a False Sense of Security

New York Times - Health: October 20, 2014
Prescribing drugs for conditions that they cannot actually cure isn’t just a benign gesture. It can cause real harm, in several ways.

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Sex, Violence and Movie Viewing

NIH Medline Plus: October 20, 2014
Source: HealthDay - Related MedlinePlus Pages: Children's Health, Parenting

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Lebanon imposes new measures against Ebola

Associated Press Healthwire: October 20, 2014
BEIRUT (AP) -- Lebanon is imposing new measures to prevent the Ebola virus from reaching the Middle Eastern nation, the health minister said Monday....

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Defining an Enterprise Imaging Strategy and Choosing a VNA

Healthcare IT News: October 20, 2014
(SPONSORED) In this video, Eric Rice, Mach7’s CTO, offers a quick summary of what to consider when defining an Enterprise Imaging Strategy and choosing a VNA and a VNA partner. Thumbnail:  read more

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Ethicist Calls CPR Too Risky in Ebola

New York Times - Health: October 20, 2014
The medical ethicist Dr. Joseph J. Fins says a medical team shouldn’t try CPR on an Ebola patient because the risks are too great for health care workers and even for some patients.

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Clinics recommend hospitals for Ebola testing

Associated Press Healthwire: October 20, 2014
When a Dallas County sheriff's deputy who had entered the apartment of the first patient to die from Ebola in the U.S. started feeling ill himself, he didn't rush to the nearest hospital. He chose an urgent-care clinic....

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Untangling the biological effects of blue light

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: October 20, 2014
Blue light can both set the mood and set in motion important biological responses. Researchers have teased apart the separate biological responses of the human eye to blue light, revealing an unexpected contest for control.

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