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Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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Home DNA Testing Kit

Simple as Spit! Home DNA Testing Kit Maps Your DNA

Simple home DNA kit allows you to find out what your DNA says about you and your family. Find out what percent of your DNA comes from populations around the world, ranging from East Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and more. Break European ancestry down into distinct regions such as the British Isles, Scandinavia and Italy. People with mixed ancestry, African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans will also get a detailed breakdown.

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EBOLA Mask

Ebola Protective Masks Are In High Demand

With the outbreak of the Ebola virus, Ebola protective gear like masks are being bought up quickly. Historically when the threat of a pandemic hits the news, the "preparers" of the world stock up. One on the first line of defense is the Ebola mask. Learn more about what types of Ebola masks can protect you here.

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Medical News Headlines

Cancer-inflammation 'vicious cycle' detailed in new study

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
New findings hidden within the complex machinery behind the chronic inflammation-cancer feedback loop have been discerned.

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VIDEO: Parkinson's mistaken for drunkenness

BBC Health: April 20, 2015
According to a new study, a quarter of people with Parkinson's say they have had their symptoms mistaken for drunkenness. Jayne McCubbin reports.

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Shipwrecked Champagne: Leathery, Still Pretty Good

Discovery Health: April 20, 2015
Chemical and sensory analysis of 170-year-old champagne recovered from the Baltic Sea reveals hints of 19th-century wine-making practices.

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Seeker Daily: Why Doctors Are Over Diagnosing Cancer

Discovery Health: April 20, 2015
South Korea appears to be facing an epidemic of thyroid cancer. But it's not because of an actual increase in the disease, only an increase in the number of people being screened for it.

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Frequent indoor tanning among teens shows correlation with smoking, social media use

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
More than a third of New Jersey high school students who engage in indoor tanning do so frequently and many would find it hard to stop the practice. Investigators also found that frequent indoor tanners were more likely to smoke and to engage in social media activities related to indoor tanning.

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PTSD common in ICU Survivors

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
Nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), new research has found. They also identified possible triggers for PTSD and indicated a potential preventive strategy: having patients keep ICU diaries.

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Interventions reduce bloodstream infections

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
A bundled intervention focused on evidence-based infection prevention practices, safety culture and teamwork, and scheduled measurement of infection rates considerably reduced central line-associated bloodstream infections across intensive care units in seven Abu Dhabi hospitals, researchers report.

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Extending natalizumab up to 8 weeks shown safe and effective in patients with MS, report says

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
Extending the dose of natalizumab from four weeks up to eight weeks was shown to be well-tolerated and effective in patients, and resulted in no cases of the potentially fatal side effect progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, researchers report.

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Two different carotid artery stenting procedures show little difference in effectiveness

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
Use of either proximal embolic protection devices (P-EPDs) or distal filter embolic protection devices (F-EPDs) during elective carotid artery stenting results in low rates of in-hospital stroke and death, according to a new study. The study found that although P-EPDs have been theorized to be more effective than F-EPDs at preventing stroke during carotid artery stenting, this first comparative effectiveness study revealed no statistically significant difference between the two devices.

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Oral milk thistle extract stops colorectal cancer stem cells from growing tumors

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
A new study shows that orally administering the chemical silibinin, purified from milk thistle, slows the ability of colorectal cancer stem cells to grow the disease. When stem cells from tumors grown in silibinin-fed conditions were re-injected into new models, the cells failed to develop equally aggressive tumors even in the absence of silibinin.

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Could a Non-Prescription Antifungal Become a Major Advance for Multiple Sclerosis?

Scientific American: Health: April 20, 2015
In 2011, Paul Tesar, a professor at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, worked with collaborators to come up with a method of producing massive numbers of mouse stem cells that are capable of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Tamper-Proof' Narcotic Painkiller May Be Curbing Abuse: Study

WebMD: April 20, 2015
Number of prescriptions, overdoses dropped, but heroin overdoses went up

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FDA Warns of Bogus Botox

WebMD: April 20, 2015
Doctors should closely examine wrinkle-reliever packaging

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Ariel Norton of Allscripts on partnership with Infinite Peripherals at HIMSS15

Healthcare IT News: April 20, 2015
Short Headline:  Ariel Norton on Infinite Peripherals (SPONSORED) Ariel Norton, Product Manager at Allscripts, talks about the growing adoption of mHealth solutions and the partnership bwtween Allscripts and Infinite Peripherals. Thumbnail:  Ariel Norton of Allscripts on partnership with Infinite Peripherals at HIMSS15 (SPONSORED) Ariel Norton, Product Manager at Allscripts, talks about the growing adoption of mHealth solutions and the partnership bwtween Allscripts and Infinite Peripherals.

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Q&A: Marijuana and the Body

New York Times - Health: April 20, 2015
Leaving aside questions of addiction and brain effects, what is known about the effects of marijuana on things like the lungs and digestive tract?

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Changes in cancer epigenome implicated in chemotherapy resistance, lymphoma relapse

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
Genomic studies have illuminated the ways in which malfunctioning genes can drive cancer growth while stunting the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy and other treatments. But new findings indicate that these genes are only partly to blame for why treatment that was at one point effective ultimately fails for about 40 percent of patients diagnosed with the most common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

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New drug combination shows promise for breaking breast cancer resistance

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
A new combination of drugs has been developed that may overcome treatment resistance and relapse in breast cancer. While most women initially respond well to hormonal treatment with drugs such as tamoxifen, many go on to develop resistance and relapse. There is evidence that this is often due to activation of the Wnt signalling pathway, a gene involved in development which fuels the growth of the tumor.

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Coast Guard Aircraft Spots 100-Year-Old Shipwrecks

Discovery Health: April 20, 2015
From the vantage point of a helicopter, Lake Michigan's tragic past becomes crystal clear. Continue reading →

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Mysterious 'Cold Spot': Fingerprint of Largest Structure in the Universe?

Discovery Health: April 20, 2015
An explanation of the CMB Cold Spot may have been found and it could be caused by the biggest structure in the known universe.

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Dogs Find Prostate Cancer by Smell

WebMD: April 20, 2015
Scientists in Italy say they have trained two dogs to “sniff out” prostate cancer with more than 90% accuracy. WebMD reports.

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Taste Salty With Less Salt

Scientific American: Health: April 20, 2015
Making salamis and cheeses with more pores might make them taste just as salty but with less added sodium finding its way into the body. Christopher Intagliata reports.   -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Drugs that activate brain stem cells may reverse multiple sclerosis

National Institutes of Health: April 20, 2015
NIH-funded study identifies over-the-counter compounds that may replace damaged cells.

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Protein pumps that allow bacteria to resist drugs

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
The structure of two closely related protein pumps that allow bacteria to resist certain medications has been described by scientists in new articles. The studies reveal that when the bacteria detect the antibiotic sulfonamide, "they turn on these transporters and pump it out, assuring survival of the cell," an author said.

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New tactic targets brain tumors

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
Patients who are obese, diabetic or both have the highest incidence of brain tumors, and they offer a clue that insulin is a factor for some glioblastoma patients. But a new study suggests drugs tested on such tumors targeted the wrong molecules.

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Childhood syndrome combining lung disease, arthritis identified

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
Using the latest genome sequencing techniques, a research team has identified a new autoimmune syndrome characterized by a combination of severe lung disease and arthritis. The hereditary disorder, which appears in early childhood, had never been diagnosed as a single syndrome. The new research revealed that it is caused by mutations in a single gene that disrupt how proteins are shuttled around within cells. Patients with the newly discovered syndrome have a poor prognosis, and at present can only be treated with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drugs. Many have lung disease so severe that they must receive lung transplants.

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New pathway reveals how immune system is regulated, gives hope for chronic diseases

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
An important new way in which our immune systems are regulated has been uncovered by researchers, giving hope that understanding it will help tackle the debilitating effects of type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and other serious diseases.

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Global pandemic of fake medicines poses urgent risk, scientists say

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
Poor quality medicines are an urgent threat that could undermine decades of successful efforts to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and TB, according to experts. Scientists report up to 41 percent of specimens failed to meet quality standards in global studies of about 17,000 drug samples.

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Pancreatic cancer loses viral defenses when talking with supporting cells

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
Researchers have unlocked a way to make pancreatic cancer cells more vulnerable to cancer-killing viruses, known as oncolytic viruses. The scientists have discovered how they can exploit the communication, or cross-talk, between pancreatic cancer and a specific cell type that supports the tumor. They found that this cross-talk weakens the ability of both cell types to fight off cancer-fighting viruses.

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Two tested approaches to treating childhood obesity appear effective

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
A study of two protocols for the treatment of childhood obesity finds that both were successful in limiting one-year weight gain in obese children. Both interventions use information technology to provide clinicians with up-to-date obesity management guidelines and tools to help families manage behaviors related to obesity and fitness.

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Fake malaria drugs not as common as previously reported

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
A rigorous analysis of antimalarial drug quality conducted in Cambodia and Tanzania found no evidence of fake medicines, according to new research. Previous reports had suggested that up to one third of antimalarials could be fake. Researchers analysed 2,028 antimalarials from Tanzania and Cambodia. Samples were selected in a rigorous and representative way making this one of the most recent comprehensive data sets on antimalarial quality.

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Happily ever after: Scientists arrange protein-nanoparticle marriage

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
Researchers have discovered a way to easily and effectively fasten proteins to nanoparticles -- essentially an arranged marriage -- by simply mixing them together. The biotechnology is in its infancy. But it already has shown promise for developing an HIV vaccine and as a way to target cancer cells.

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Reducing global tobacco use

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
Although global efforts to cut tobacco use have had some success, more can be done to reduce the number of deaths from smoking, according to a new commentary. More than 170 countries have signed the World Health Organization's (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control agreement since it was adopted in 2005. However, smoking rates are still high in many low- and middle-income countries compared with Canada and other high-income countries where efforts to curb smoking have been more successful.

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Video games in care homes: connecting older adults, or exposing age-related vulnerability?

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: April 20, 2015
Introducing video games as a means of bringing older adults in long-term care together may not always be an easy task, according to new research. Offering stimulating and accessible leisure activities such as this can be difficult for care providers as the impact of age-related changes and impairments on residents grows, authors of a new study warn.

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