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Fitbit Flex Sleep Sensor Tracker

Will health sensors make humans immortal?

Not so fast! We need to get from here to there. Today, health/behavior monitoring and quantification sensors are all the rage. The Fitbit, a wearable sensor, is one of the more popular wearable tech devices for tracking your health. Fitbit tracks your activity (steps), diet, and even your sleep patterns. You can interact with the Fitbit using a series of tapping sequences and the Fitbit syncs all your data with your phone and computer. Then the process is to quantify, analyze, and optimize your wake and sleep life. Doing all this will not help you avoid your ultimate demise, but it could contribute to a longer life, and better yet, one where you're in better health along your life's time-line. The concept is that if you are monitoring your activity, food, and sleep, you can make adjustments to improve these areas; thus better health. The Fitbit Flex is only $99! Get started Buy directly from Fitbit

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The Art of Lip Injections

The Secret Art of Natural Lip Injections

Is there a secret art to lip enhancement? You surely know when you've seen someone and immediately reacted, "she had her lips done!". What about the lips that have been filled, look terrific, and you don't know they've been enhanced with filler? That's the secret art to lip fillers and that is why it is critical to select a physician injector who knows the secrets. What are the secrets to getting great lip enhancements? First, experience! Second, the artist within! The injector must also understand the complex, and sometimes unforgiving, anatomy of the lips. These artistic and technical demands explain why so many patients receive sub-standard lip injections and are left with unnatural results. Patients often believe that lip enhancement always leads to unnatural, over-filled results; in actuality, this should never occur in experienced hands.

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PSA Screenings Decline

PSA Screenings Decline Following New Recommendations

The Journal of Urology reports that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing has declined in the United States following a 2013 recommendation by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)—a group of primary care physicians charged with developing recommendations about which preventative health screenings should be covered under the Affordable Health Care Act.

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Medical News Headlines

USDA seizes more than 1,200 illegal giant snails

Associated Press Healthwire: August 29, 2014
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The giant African snail damages buildings, destroys crops and can cause meningitis in humans. But some people still want to collect, and even eat, the slimy invaders....

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Parents snatch ill boy, 5, from ward

BBC Health: August 29, 2014
Police launch a "major investigation" to find a five-year-old boy with a brain tumour, who was taken without consent from Southampton General Hospital by his parents.

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Ebola in mind, US colleges screen some students

Associated Press Healthwire: August 29, 2014
BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) -- College students from West Africa may be subject to extra health checks when they arrive to study in the United States as administrators try to insulate their campuses from the worst Ebola outbreak in history....

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Poison Pen: In Plastics and Cans, a Threat to Women

New York Times - Health: August 28, 2014
BPA worries scientists for a number of reasons, but evidence is gathering for one concern in particular: infertility.

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NIH to Launch Human Safety Study of Ebola Vaccine Candidate

NIH Medline Plus: August 28, 2014
Source: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Related MedlinePlus Page: Ebola

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Remaking Medicine: Expansion of Mental Health Care Hits Obstacles

New York Times - Health: August 28, 2014
The Affordable Care Act has paved the way for one of the largest expansion of mental health coverage in a generation, increasing access for millions.

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The New Old Age: How to Complain to Medicare

New York Times - Health: August 28, 2014
Revealed: the semi-secret phone numbers that beneficiaries are supposed to use to complain to Medicare.

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Up to 3,000 times the bacterial growth on hollow-head toothbrushes

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 28, 2014
Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria compared to hollow-head toothbrushes, according to new research.

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Human trial of Ebola vaccine to start next week

CNN Health: August 28, 2014
A highly anticipated test of an experimental Ebola vaccine will begin next week, amid mounting anxiety about the spread of the deadly virus in West Africa.

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Brussels Sprouts, Quinoa Pilaf, and Cauliflower and Broccoli Au Gratin

WebMD: August 28, 2014
Elaine Magee, MPH, RD, shares recipes for Thanksgiving side dishes: Brussels sprouts with bacon, quinoa pilaf with cranberries and pecans, and cauliflower and broccoli au gratin.

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Synthesis produces new fungus-derived antibiotic

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 28, 2014
A fortuitous collaboration has led to the total synthesis of a recently discovered natural antibiotic. The laboratory recreation of a fungus-derived antibiotic, viridicatumtoxin B, may someday help bolster the fight against bacteria that evolve resistance to treatments in hospitals and clinics around the world.

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Indoor mold poses health risk to asthma sufferers

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 28, 2014
By critically reviewing the findings from 17 studies in eight different countries, the research has found that the presence of several types of mould can lead to breathing problems in asthma sufferers, as well as increasing the likelihood of developing the condition.

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NIH issues genomic data sharing rules

Healthcare IT News: August 28, 2014
The National Institutes of Health has issued a final policy it hopes will promote genomic data sharing as a way to improve health while still protecting the privacy of research participants. [See also: Genomics come to HIE] The NIH Genomic Data Sharing policy traces back to the Human Genome Project, which necessitated rapid and broad data release during its mapping and sequencing of the human genome, officials say. read more

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The Dawn of the Post-Clinic Abortion

New York Times - Health: August 28, 2014
Some activists like Rebecca Gomperts are now imagining the unthinkable: a future where most abortions happen at home.

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WHO warns 20,000 at risk of Ebola

BBC Health: August 28, 2014
The UN's health agency says the deadly Ebola outbreak in West Africa could infect more than 20,000 people, and urges airlines to resume flights.

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New DEA rule means changes to eRx

Healthcare IT News: August 28, 2014
A restrictive new rule change from the Drug Enforcement Administration, making it more difficult for physicians to prescribe opioids, will necessitate some changes to e-prescribing products and practices. [See also: DEA: They want a new drug] read more

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Concussion Recovery Can Reverse After Return to Activity, Study Shows

WebMD: August 28, 2014
Expert and researcher say the findings highlight need for slow return to playing field

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Everyone wants a piece of pop health

Healthcare IT News: August 28, 2014
Healthcare organizations are struggling to get a handle on population health, according to a new report from Chilmark Research. Chilmark's 2014 Analytics for Population Health Management Market Trends Report reveals a market that, while seeing strong growth of interest, is still very much in its infancy. read more

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Sam Kass, the Obamas’ Foodmaster General

New York Times - Health: August 28, 2014
Mr. Kass, the first family’s personal chef, has one of the highest public profiles of anyone in the East Wing and a window into the zealously guarded space and tastes of the Obama White House.

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NIH to Launch Human Safety Study of Ebola Vaccine Candidate

National Institutes of Health: August 28, 2014
Trial is First in Series of Accelerated Safety Studies of Ebola Vaccines.

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Concussion Recovery

NIH Medline Plus: August 28, 2014
Source: HealthDay - Related MedlinePlus Pages: Concussion, School Health, Sports Injuries

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Gerry Hinkley - Privacy & Security Forum 2014 San Diego

Healthcare IT News: August 28, 2014
Gerry Hinkley, a partner in Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman's health care practice in San Francisco, provides advice on HIPAA preparation and planning for and responding to a breach. Thumbnail:  read more

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Avatars make the Internet sign to deaf people

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 28, 2014
It is challenging for deaf people to learn a sound-based language, since they are physically not able to hear those sounds. Hence, most of them struggle with written language as well as with text reading and comprehension. Therefore, most website content remains inaccessible for them. Computer scientists want to change the situation by means of a method they developed: animated online characters display content in sign language. In the long term, deaf people would be able to use the technique to communicate on online platforms via sign language.

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Readers with dyslexia have disrupted network connections in the brain, map the circuitry of dyslexia shows

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 28, 2014
Dyslexia, the most commonly diagnosed learning disability in the United States, is a neurological reading disability that occurs when the regions of the brain that process written language don't function normally. The use of non-invasive functional neuroimaging tools has helped characterize how brain activity is disrupted in dyslexia. However, most prior work has focused on only a small number of brain regions, leaving a gap in our understanding of how multiple brain regions communicate with one another through networks, called functional connectivity, in persons with dyslexia. Scientists have now conducted a whole-brain functional connectivity analysis of dyslexia using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

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From nose to knee: Engineered cartilage regenerates joints

ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine: August 28, 2014
Human articular cartilage defects can be treated with nasal septum cells. Researchers now report that cells taken from the nasal septum are able to adapt to the environment of the knee joint and can thus repair articular cartilage defects. The nasal cartilage cells' ability to self-renew and adapt to the joint environment is associated with the expression of so-called HOX genes.

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Pennsylvania to Purchase Private Care for Its Poor

New York Times - Health: August 28, 2014
Pennsylvania will become the 27th state to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, using federal funds to buy private health insurance for some 500,000 low-income residents starting next year.

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Matter: Parasites Practicing Mind Control

New York Times - Health: August 28, 2014
A new study suggests that Toxoplasma can turn its host’s genes on and off, influencing behavior.

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US to begin safety testing Ebola vaccine next week

Associated Press Healthwire: August 28, 2014
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Federal researchers next week will start testing humans with an experimental vaccine to prevent the deadly Ebola virus....

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For Dessert, May I Recommend the Buglava?

Scientific American: Health: August 28, 2014
An argument for additional alimentary arthropods -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Electrical stimulation 'aids memory'

BBC Health: August 28, 2014
Electromagnetic stimulation of a specific part of the brain may improve the ability to remember certain facts, researchers say.

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Plain packs 'no effect on smokers'

BBC Health: August 28, 2014
A study of smokers in Australia suggests there is "no evidence" that the introduction of standardised cigarette packaging has changed the way people buy cigarettes.

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Injected Drugs Said to Kill Man in Flawed Execution

New York Times - Health: August 28, 2014
The report, prepared by the Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences in Dallas, did not explore what caused Clayton D. Lockett’s execution to go awry in Oklahoma.

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Top security needs philosophical shift

Healthcare IT News: August 28, 2014
If you knew that assailants or robbers had continuous access to your house, how would that change the way you manage home security? And if the door and window locks, fences, even the big-ticket alarm systems were not enough?   One option: You might assume every time you walk inside that someone is lying in wait. read more

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Doctors: Early school start times unhealthy

CNN Health: August 28, 2014
If you think school starts too early, you aren't the only one.

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Veterans get second chance

CNN Health: August 28, 2014
Veterans treatment courts are helping former warriors who struggle with drug and alcohol addiction.

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Being an addict's mom

CNN Health: August 28, 2014
How do parents of addicts help their children without enabling them? CNN's Kelly Wallace gets a painfully honest look at what it's like to be in this situation.

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